cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

Green cabinet on property land

MarcinST
Tuning in

Hi, I'm in the process of buying a house and there is a VM cabinet on the property's land. As far as I know, the previous owners of the house never gave permission for the installation. Please can someone advise what I need to do to move this cabinet to another location on public land?1.jpgScreenshot_20240612-114308~3.png

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions

goslow
Alessandro Volta

Nope not necessarily. It just means that they weren't drawn on the plan when it was made. On my own property deeds it mentions the 'T' bars defining the boundary but my site map shows no 'T' bars at all and the deeds note that no 'T' bars were ever drawn in.

You could try contacting your local highways authority (assuming the roads around your house are adopted roads) to find out where the highway boundary lies but they are likely to charge for the service.

I am not a solicitor so the above is nothing more than a personal opinion. Speak to your solicitor about all of this for proper advice and what to do to investigate and resolve.

See where this Helpful Answer was posted

26 REPLIES 26

-tony-
Alessandro Volta

have a search theres a very similar thread thats going nowhere somewhere - VM will do nothing - staff here will send you a pm askng for details and do nothing as there is nothing they can do - you can shortcut all the delays they will throw up and go straight to go - you are obviously talking to a solicitor for the house purchase - you need proof that permission was not given - if it was VM will have a wayleave document that they should be able to produce - i doubt they will have it - if not its for your solicitor to write - thats likely to be ignored so from there an action in the small claims court i think for a judgement

as said VM will ignore you and your solicitor - thats how the proceed hoping you will go away and all will be forgotten

i think one piece of advice in the other thread involved wire cutters and then deny them access when all served by that cabinet are cut off - extreme but if you are 100% certain its on your land then thats your right - but talk to your solicitor first before you even consider that

____________________

Tony.
Sacked VIP

goslow
Alessandro Volta

Read the two recent topics below for past discussion

https://community.virginmedia.com/t5/QuickStart-set-up-and/Move-a-Virgin-Street-Cabinet/m-p/5527757

https://community.virginmedia.com/t5/Community-Natter/Move-a-Virgin-Media-green-street-cabinet/m-p/5...

Then engage your solicitor to investigate further the deeds for the property.

AIUI, the 'T' bars on your plan usually indicate a site boundary in which case the cabinet would be outside your boundary. The red line is indicative rather than definitive. Not to say you might not be right but there is probably a lot more involved than just the red line.

Roger_Gooner
Alessandro Volta

That looks like utility's cover in the foreground and is that a light pole I see in the background? You'll most likely never get those moved without a court battle, and utility companies and the council have bigger pockets than you.

--
Hub 5, TP-Link TL-SG108S 8-port gigabit switch, 360
My Broadband Ping - Roger's VM hub 5 broadband connection

thank you for reply, I don't see a T sign in the front garden either, does that mean it doesn't belong to me?

goslow
Alessandro Volta

Nope not necessarily. It just means that they weren't drawn on the plan when it was made. On my own property deeds it mentions the 'T' bars defining the boundary but my site map shows no 'T' bars at all and the deeds note that no 'T' bars were ever drawn in.

You could try contacting your local highways authority (assuming the roads around your house are adopted roads) to find out where the highway boundary lies but they are likely to charge for the service.

I am not a solicitor so the above is nothing more than a personal opinion. Speak to your solicitor about all of this for proper advice and what to do to investigate and resolve.

that is a catv cover in the foreground and pole is the agency's sign that the house is for sale

jpeg1
Alessandro Volta

Just bear in mind that to move the cabinet, the access chamber in front of it and all the cables leading to it will be very expensive. It will also disrupt the broadband service to all the customers connected to it. 

Someone will have to pay for this, and Virginmedia will try very, very hard to ensure that it isn't them. 

- jpeg1
My name is NOT Alessandro. That's just a tag Virginmedia sticks on some contributors. Please ignore it.

unisoft
Knows their stuff

If you have legal protection on House Insurance, speak to them first for advice, then see a solicitor. They usually cover boundary disputes and such. A solicitor will take time on this, and it will cost.

I just wonder why VM can't do as good job as BT Openreach 😞2.jpg3.png