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Virgin mislead, lie, and disrespect customers

AkeelHabib
Joining in

I joined Virgin media because I was offered 6 months subscription to Netflix but after speaking to customer advisor over the phone I was informed no such offer existed. I revisited the Virgin staff who originally sold me the package and I'm told I need to call Virgin again and explain it's in my contract. I have checked through all my emails, contracts, terms and conditions, and nothing states anything about a 6 month subscription to Netfix. When I check my Virgin Media account on the website and select 'Media and Entertainment' i'm repeatedly being asked to sign back in like there's an issue with the site. It's the same problem on different servers. Isn't it convenient for Virgin that there's no way of resolving this issue as a customer, it's basically on par with theft and if this was the other way around I would be made accountable for breaking laws.

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions

Andrew-G
Alessandro Volta

All phone calls to VM call centres are recorded, so if it was a telesale there will be the evidence.  However, from the sound of it, this seems more like a field sales agent did the lying?  Which is unfortunately a moderately frequent occurrence partly due to poor monitoring, management and control of the field sales agents by VM, partly it's an inherent problem with all field sales by any company, where agents make most (sometimes all) of their money from closing a sale, and as a result they'll promise anything, hoping that the lack of proof in respect of a verbal promise will mean they'll get away scot free.  In this case, we're talking about the value of Netflix for 18 months, that's what, £200 odd, well worth fighting for. 

AkeelHabib, I'd recommend you speak to Citizens Advice, and report VM for mis-selling, asking what your options are.  If the agent promised you something that you relied upon when entering the contract with VM (even verbally), that becomes legally binding upon VM (Consumer Rights Act 2015, Section 50).  Whilst it may come down to your word against the agent, I doubt that VM would want to try defending this in court, although you might have to take it that far with a court claim against VM using the online small claims track.  Citizens Advice can explain more.  Before court action you can and should use VM's formal complaint process demanding Netflix be added to your account as agreed plus £70 compensation for the mis-selling and poor customer service (this will be fobbed off, but you have to do that before the next step), then try CISAS the industry arbitration scheme (add another £50 compensation in respect of the poor handling of any fobbed-off complaint), and if CISAS won't uphold your claim, then go for a court claim - court fee is around £18 from memory, probably worth that.

Of course, forum staff generally have been doing a good job of resolving problems caused by other parts of VM, so perhaps they could revisit this and recognise that this is yet another field mis-sales case, and choose to amicably and generously resolve it?  Or they could hide behind VM's processes, and watch as this slides towards another expensive visit to CISAS.  Even if CISAS don't uphold it, the court would probably take the customer's statement as evidential on a balance of probabilities.  They might also want to consider that it is the season of goodwill, not the season of "you can't prove nuffink, we're not giving you what our dodgy sales agent promised, yer should've checked everfing, **** you, ner ner ner!"  

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7 REPLIES 7

John_GS
Forum Team
Forum Team

Hi AkeelHabib

Thanks for posting and welcome to the community. Sorry to hear of this Netflix dispute - do you have documentation of this offer?

Let us know

John_GS
Forum Team


Need a helpful hand to show you how to make a payment? Check out our guide - How to pay my Virgin Media bill

Swf
Fibre optic

Let I was lied to many times on the phone and then asked to prove it.    The staf on here should be ashamed asking do you have documents when it was via a phone call.    Keep fighting. Make it as loudly as you can. 

Andrew-G
Alessandro Volta

All phone calls to VM call centres are recorded, so if it was a telesale there will be the evidence.  However, from the sound of it, this seems more like a field sales agent did the lying?  Which is unfortunately a moderately frequent occurrence partly due to poor monitoring, management and control of the field sales agents by VM, partly it's an inherent problem with all field sales by any company, where agents make most (sometimes all) of their money from closing a sale, and as a result they'll promise anything, hoping that the lack of proof in respect of a verbal promise will mean they'll get away scot free.  In this case, we're talking about the value of Netflix for 18 months, that's what, £200 odd, well worth fighting for. 

AkeelHabib, I'd recommend you speak to Citizens Advice, and report VM for mis-selling, asking what your options are.  If the agent promised you something that you relied upon when entering the contract with VM (even verbally), that becomes legally binding upon VM (Consumer Rights Act 2015, Section 50).  Whilst it may come down to your word against the agent, I doubt that VM would want to try defending this in court, although you might have to take it that far with a court claim against VM using the online small claims track.  Citizens Advice can explain more.  Before court action you can and should use VM's formal complaint process demanding Netflix be added to your account as agreed plus £70 compensation for the mis-selling and poor customer service (this will be fobbed off, but you have to do that before the next step), then try CISAS the industry arbitration scheme (add another £50 compensation in respect of the poor handling of any fobbed-off complaint), and if CISAS won't uphold your claim, then go for a court claim - court fee is around £18 from memory, probably worth that.

Of course, forum staff generally have been doing a good job of resolving problems caused by other parts of VM, so perhaps they could revisit this and recognise that this is yet another field mis-sales case, and choose to amicably and generously resolve it?  Or they could hide behind VM's processes, and watch as this slides towards another expensive visit to CISAS.  Even if CISAS don't uphold it, the court would probably take the customer's statement as evidential on a balance of probabilities.  They might also want to consider that it is the season of goodwill, not the season of "you can't prove nuffink, we're not giving you what our dodgy sales agent promised, yer should've checked everfing, **** you, ner ner ner!"  

The only proof I have is the details of the actual Virgin staff member who offered me the Netflix deal. He had a tablet device and used it to sign me up, I witnessed him select an option on his screen for Netflix as we were adding my details. Why would he give me his details and offer personal assistance if he was lying to me? Not unless he was trained to believe he was making a legitimate offer. It's obvious by the type of complaints about this company that there's some level of misleading going on towards customers and it's probably the same for the staff who suffer in a similar way.

They call from normal mobiles  and the one who lied to me text me  then asked to talk and then called me on  whatapps

    They know how to get  to get away with it they have been doing it for years.  No one cares.   It's  incredible.       But they lie most of the ones on the phone like and pressure sell.   The calls are not recorded or they. Would have to tell you before they lied to you.     

AkeelHabib: The only proof I have is the details of the actual Virgin staff member who offered me the Netflix deal.

If the agent agrees that they offered and you accepted the offer of Netflix at the cost you both agreed on, then this is down to a system or process fault with VM's sales systems, rather than one of intent.  In that case you should ask if they'll confirm that by email to you for the purposes of sorting out the error with VM's back office staff.  If they provide that, with the email then you have proof, it's then a matter of bludgeoning VM's complaints system into accepting that a valid legally binding contract exists.

If they won't provide a confirmatory email, then as above, speak to Citizens Advice.  In that case it's your word against Virgin Media, but there's a reasonable chance that the court would accept your word above that of the company, even if the company choose to try and defend any court claim.

Thank you for that information AkeelHabib.

I can take a look at the account for you to see if there are any notes with regards to this offer. 

We would need some form of correspondence or history of the offer to be able to provide this though. 

I will private message you now to confirm details. 

^Martin