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Timwilky
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WIFI 6 (e)ven serving

Simple question as I cannot find a solution.

My core home network is based on 10Gb technology. Two switches with aggregation on a pair of SFP+ for 20Gb fibre back haul between home and the office at the end of the garden, NAS/ESXi/dev servers/clients etc. Are connected at 10Gb.

I now have a number of wifi devices that are supposed to be wifi 6 compliant. But currently my access points are old ac based routers set to act as access points.

I have never been a great fan of wifi. especially in it's older slower days. But I am realising it now has its place as so called speeds are now exceeding domestic lan 1GB (in the perfect world). So I am now looking to make that wifi leap.

But the important thing for me is throughput, not just wifi, but to the network infrastructure. So I am looking for a device that will provide solid wifi AX 6(e) with full bandwidth back to the core network which means at least a 10Gbase-t connection

Am I still waiting for todays technology to be developed? Surely tomorrows should be looking to integrate with current 40Gb networks. Or are the vendors doing a BT and trying to milk every penny out of obsolete technologies before supporting the current day?  

 

Same for Virgin, when will multi Gb broadband be available. In Preston you are only providing 600Mb with rubbish upload of 42Mb, surely 10% asynchronous  download/upload should be the norm.

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Andrew-G
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Re: WIFI 6 (e)ven serving

Or are the vendors doing a BT and trying to milk every penny out of obsolete technologies before supporting the current day?  

I think your requirements are sufficiently demanding that you'd be looking at enterprise grade products, but I suspect even most of those will be designed as office or public space WAPs to connect a load of corporate mobiles at 80 Mbps and a few roving wireless laptops.  Expecting a 10 Gig connection back to the LAN is, shall we say, niche?  

In terms of vendors, hardware makers of almost any kind are in a brutal cut throat market, where buyers always SAY they'll pay more for better quality, but most then go on to buy the cheapest, or at best a cheaper clone of the pioneer product.  R&D costs have to be brutally controlled, and the output limited to nothing more than the market will pay in the next twelve months.  And spending a couple of pence on a better capacitor or socket sounds low cost, but manufacturing costs are trebled by logistics and chain mark ups.  That's why the industry uses cheapy components that you or I would pooh-pooh, and has so many standards - it's not really to make things work together, it's to avoid the risk of high R&D costs to develop a product that people then don't buy (Betamax being the archetypal example). Worth noting that even though VM's Hub 4 has an 1100 Mbps upstream capability and tested 2.5 Gbps potential, it is hobbled by nominal 1 Gig ethernet ports and the now antiquated 802.11ac wifi.

So in a nut shell, yes, everybody's trying to get the most out of today's technology, rather than go all Star Trek, and the go bust.  You might find tech that does what you want, but you are so far out on the cutting edge that your choices could be very few and prices out of this world.

Maybe somebody else knows better?

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Anonymous
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Re: WIFI 6 (e)ven serving

"Or are the vendors doing a BT and trying to milk every penny out of obsolete technologies before supporting the current day? "

you think ISP would offer 10GBPS network.
So how much did you pay for your 10/40bgps network. Was it £40 like the cost of the ISP routers.

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Timwilky
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Re: WIFI 6 (e)ven serving

Yes I am aware my home network exceeds the normal domestic. But so do my requirements.

I posted on here to avoid virgin specific and to try to stick to general networking.

My requirements is to find the device that in the real world will give me as near to full bandwidth throughput. My current laptop is a Dell 5550. It has no network ports unless I  connect adaptors  to a USB c. But has a WiFi card rated to provide 2.4 Gb. So what access point.

If I am going to have multiple wifi devices in the office in the future as more providers drop cable support. How to ensure all get served the max bandwidth they can support and the device can support the aggregated  load?

As a vm close. Yes. The hub 4 is a cludge designed to meet the first to 1Gb. It is most definitely not a device for the long term. And an expensive device when all that is required is a modem. Firewall, nat, etc I  do far better myself than any vm hub will ever do.

 

 

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Anonymous
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Re: WIFI 6 (e)ven serving

the Asus RT-AX86U has a 2.5gbps LAN port.
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jem101
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Re: WIFI 6 (e)ven serving

I'm not too sure that there are any wifi 6e access points available right now, probably by the end of this year. As you probably know, it's not just a case of sticking a 10 Gbit/s network interface on the end of a wifi radio - the entire thing has to be engineered to handle the throughput otherwise it's just a pointless box-ticking exercise to keep the marketing people happy.

Right now you might want to look at the Aruba 515 or 555 wifi 6 APs, I quite like Aruba kit (now part of HP) but even these 'only' have a 2.5 Gbit/s and a pair of 5 Gbit/s ethernet ports respectively - but they are much more likely to be able to sustain the throughput. Not surprisingly these are enterprise-grade devices and you would be looking at around £1000 for each access point.

Oh and remember that if a wifi device claims a speed of x Gbit/s, that's the theoretical link speed, actual real-world data throughput will be around a quarter to a third of that - at best!

JJG1992
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Re: WIFI 6 (e)ven serving

Have you looked in to the Netgear RAXE500 its wifi 6e 6Ghz its compatible with older wifi 5 devices aswell as having a 2.5G/5G multi gig wan/lan port there's also the RAX120 its wifi 6 with the same multi gig port as the RAXE500 

My Broadband Ping - 500Mbps
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ToffeeSurprise
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Message 8 of 8
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Re: WIFI 6 (e)ven serving

I doubt we'll see any 802.11ax access points with a 10Gbps port any time soon, if ever. 5Gbps ports should be more than enough for the backhaul on the residential side. If we were getting into the realm of MU-MIMO where crazy backhaul is needed, that's enterprise.

The standard tops out at 9 Gbps, but that requires 8 spatial streams, operating at the highest MCS per stream, 1024QAM 5/6 with 160MHz channel bonding.

As a general rule of thumb, whatever the claims made, e.g. some Netgear 802.11ax APs suggests 1800Mbps, I'd instantly throw half of that away for real world usage.

I'm trying to find the 802.11ax MCS data, but seeing as 256QAM needs an SNR of 40dB, and going up would generally need at least another 6dB SNR to increase the constellation size, you're probably looking at a required SNR of something like 48 dB. In all likelihood you probably wouldn't get that in a built up area even right next to the AP.

Or the short version, really don't sweat it. Get something with a 2.5Gbps or 5Gbps port instead of worrying about bandwidth you'd never get anyway.

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