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Loosing copper Phone lines so why pay line rental?

THEGUYVER
On our wavelength

Like everyone else i received a letter saying there doing away with the old line to FO through the hub, but my bill isnt changing its still charging me for line rental even though its going through my broadband hub which i also pay for!  WHY??

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nodrogd
Very Insightful Person
Very Insightful Person

@THEGUYVER wrote:

Like everyone else i received a letter saying there doing away with the old line to FO through the hub, but my bill isnt changing its still charging me for line rental even though its going through my broadband hub which i also pay for!  WHY??


Because all that has changed is the removal of the analogue copper pair between your house & the nearest local street fibre node. From that point to the exchange the phone service has always converted to digital over fibre anyway. You are still using the same (expensive to run) analogue PSTN exchange at the cable headend.

Stage two of the switchover happens in 2025, with the synchronised shutdown of all PSTN exchanges including BTs.

VM 350BB 2xV6 & Landline. Freeview/Freesat HD, ASDA/Tesco PAYG Mobile. Cable customer since 1993

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11 REPLIES 11

jpeg1
Alessandro Volta

You are paying for a phone service. It is still the same service with the same number. It will just be connected to your house in a different way. 

- jpeg1
My name is NOT Alessandro. That's just a tag Virginmedia sticks on some contributors. Please ignore it.

nodrogd
Very Insightful Person
Very Insightful Person

@THEGUYVER wrote:

Like everyone else i received a letter saying there doing away with the old line to FO through the hub, but my bill isnt changing its still charging me for line rental even though its going through my broadband hub which i also pay for!  WHY??


Because all that has changed is the removal of the analogue copper pair between your house & the nearest local street fibre node. From that point to the exchange the phone service has always converted to digital over fibre anyway. You are still using the same (expensive to run) analogue PSTN exchange at the cable headend.

Stage two of the switchover happens in 2025, with the synchronised shutdown of all PSTN exchanges including BTs.

VM 350BB 2xV6 & Landline. Freeview/Freesat HD, ASDA/Tesco PAYG Mobile. Cable customer since 1993

I'm a Very Insightful Person, I'm here to share knowledge, I don't work for Virgin Media. Learn more

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jb66
Very Insightful Person
Very Insightful Person

How do you think your broadband gets into your house?

THEGUYVER
On our wavelength

I think it gets to my house via the fibre optic wires (which I'm not even sure they are due to no wiring upgrades near me since i joined in around 2000) that also supply my broadband , at least that's what i am assuming. 

nodrogd
Very Insightful Person
Very Insightful Person

@THEGUYVER wrote:

I think it gets to my house via the fibre optic wires (which I'm not even sure they are due to no wiring upgrades near me since i joined in around 2000) that also supply my broadband , at least that's what i am assuming. 


It gets to your house via a copper coaxial cable (in 95% of the network area), your street cabinet is fed in a chain of coax cabinets that terminate at a fibre node that can be up to 1km away, where the connection is fibre back to the cable headend. Cable Broadband is true Broadband (it uses a huge chunk of radio spectrum) compared to down a phone cable, which is unshielded.

Improvements in compression techniques mean that the humble copper coax that has been there for years is now quite capable of 10Gbps download speeds. Upload speeds are restricted to 10% (although there is the facility to double this) due to the restrictions of carrying Broadcast cable TV channels alongside the Broadband.

Virgin is in the process of moving away from cable class services by 2028 to XGS-PON full fibre across the entire network. When your local phone wiring is switched off the contractors usually move in to install the cabinet infrastructure changes required for full fibre.

VM 350BB 2xV6 & Landline. Freeview/Freesat HD, ASDA/Tesco PAYG Mobile. Cable customer since 1993

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I notice that you have vontage as 2nd line. Can you explain how this works?

Vonage are a VoIP telephony provider, basically, you sign up with them, they either provide you with a new phone number (and this doesn’t have to be a ‘geographic number’, ie imagine your existing telephone number starts 01322 (ie SE London/North Kent) but you would rather have, say a number starting 0203, that’s fine), or they can port your existing number to their service so you keep that*.

They send you a small box, it’s about the size a couple of decks of playing cards stacked on top of each other, this box has three sockets, a power supply, (which they send you), an RJ45 socket for an Ethernet cable to connect to the VM router, and an RJ11 socket to connect your existing handset (for the latter, you may need an adapter which I can’t remember if they include but are about £2 on Amazon). And that’s it.

On powering up, the box registers itself with the Vonage service, it flaps around for about five minutes and then just works.

You will need to pay Vonage a monthly sum of £x and the value of x depends on what you want, I was a customer some years ago, paid about £10 a month and all calls to UK landline numbers were included, ie free! Calls to some overseas numbers were free as well, landlines only, I recall my ex-wife, calling her mother in a hotel in America and it not costing anything beyond the monthly payment. Plus, of course, it’s platform agnostic, ie, if you leave VM or move, just connect the box to your new provider and the number stays the same and just works!

I might be tempted to say that is magical, but, for my sins, I do this for a living and understand perfectly well how the underlying technology works, hint, it’s not magic!

* OK slight word of warning, in theory this is perfectly possible and a sort-of requirement by providers, but, in the real world, all sorts of oddball stuff can happen and from time to time a number ports just fails. In that instance, you are knee deep in the mire of talking to multiple providers, neither of which are overly concerned with your ‘petty issue’, as they will see it!

It will probably all work out, but there is a non-zero chance that you might lose the number, is this something you can work around?

Sebastiondarcy
Joining in

Thank you for taking the time to respond.

I should have declared that I have mesh WIFI based on TPLink P9's and the VM router is configured as a modem.  Does this matter? Can I just plug a RJ45 patch cable into a spare network port i.e. not necessarily the router?

Our street has just been wired up by Toob and they offer a Mbyte access but no telephone or t.v. service. I looked at using them and came across Vontage.  They recommended them. I'd pay less than the VM's call charges (for a few UK landlines) than Vontage for international calls to landline and mobile calls to where my family live.

When this shut down occurs in 2025 will this rental end or will Virgin find a way to continue screwing their customers