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Tirrick
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Why WiFi 2.4 or 5ghz?

I have a Hub 3 router, and a Netgear Orbi mesh system is connected to it via an ethernet cable, to help me get a stronger wifi connection to places the furtherest away from the Virgin router.

I am about to add another satellite to my Orbi router but before I do I'd like to understand something.

Some of my devices (phones, printers, Sonis speakers, Ring devices etc) are connected to the Virgin 2.4ghz band and some are connected to 5ghz. To my knowledge I have never consciously selected one or other band. How does this happen? 

And, would it be better if I were to select one or other band to reach those devices at a longer distance. For example, my Ring security camera at the back of the house. 

If so, how do I do that for individual devices?

Many thanks in advice for any help.

 

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mjpartyboy
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Re: Why WiFi 2.4 or 5ghz?

Optimally configured 5 GHz will give you a better change at achieving higher throughput with compatible devices, whereas 2.4 GHz is limited to lower throughput, but its signal is able to travel further than 5 GHz.

I prefer to run them as two separate bands and do not rely on Smart Connect / Wi-Fi, so I can choose what to connect to each band, such as higher speed and more bandwidth hungry devices on 5 GHz and older, less bandwidth intensive devices on 2.4 GHz.
SH2 modem mode | AC86U router | AC68U node
Andrew-G
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Re: Why WiFi 2.4 or 5ghz?

When a wireless device is presented with multiple available networks for which it has access credentials, it will follow the maker's algorithm for selecting one.  Nominally it would make sense to choose the strongest signal, but faced with a choice of slightly weaker 5GHz (faster, more reliable) over a stronger 2.4 GHz (slower, often congested, but greater range) there's a tradeoff to be made, and the device will use whatever the coding tells it to do.  Obviously some devices (particularly printers and "smart home" trinketry) only have a 2.4 GHz capability, usually to keep manufacturing cost down.  A further wrinkle is that when presented with two networks sharing the same name, some devices get their knickers in a twist, and keep swapping between them, or can't connect at all.  So That's why mrpartyboy says keep the network names for 5GHz and 2.4 GHz different, as that gives you a bit more control.

Your wording implies that you're running both the Orbis and the Hub wifi at the same time.  As a rule that's not optimal, but it can be done.  You have configured the Orbis in access point mode?

Personally I'd run the hub in modem mode (as I do with my TP-Link mesh) and rely on the Orbis to manage all connections, wired or wireless, because the vast majority of mesh systems are far more modern and capable than the cheap antique routers built into ISP hubs.

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Tirrick
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Re: Why WiFi 2.4 or 5ghz?

Thanks a bunch for this helpful information. I hope you don't mind me asking for a bit more clarification.

When I set up the Orbi router and satellites, I just followed the set up instructions via the Orbi app. I didn't do it manually and therefore didn't make any changes to the configuration. I set them up with the same network name and password as my existing network, which is what was advised. They design these systems with people like me in mind who down really have the technical know-how to do it differently.
I am therefore not sure if the Orbi router is in access point mode, but probably not.
If I was going to do what you suggest and run the hub in modem mode, could you give me a step by step guide as to how to do that, or point me to a reliable source where I can find that information?
Much gratitude, Mary
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Andrew-G
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Re: Netgear Orbi - help!

I'm sorry I know what I'd want to do, and then be able to do that "hands-on", but I can't offer advice that detailed via the forum since I'm not familiar with the Netgear Orbi.  Hopefully a change of post title will attract other users who do have Orbis to assist. 

They may need to know the exact model you've got (eg CBK43), how many Orbi units you've got, and the property size and type (eg four bedroom modern detached, three storey Victorian semi, etc).  If the hub is in modem mode only one ethernet port will work, and you'll have the first Orbi connected to that, any other wired devices will need to connect to the Orbi's ethernet port, and also the hub itself won't be broadcasting any wifi signal.  

As a quick summary for anybody picking this up, the question I believe is "For a user who's not well versed in the technical side of things, how do I set my Hub and Orbi's up with modem mode on the Hub, and router mode on the Orbi's?"

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Tirrick
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Re: Netgear Orbi - help!

Thank you. Especially for the tip about only having one Ethernet connection on the Hub. I have 2, one going to the Orbi router, and the other to my husbands desktop in his studio. I’m going to take some time to think this through before I make any changes.
M
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Andrew-G
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Message 7 of 7
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Re: Netgear Orbi - help!

That's sensible.

If you need more ethenet ports then you can connect what's grandly titled as an "umanaged gigabit ethernet switch" to the Orbi, they're only about fifteen quid online.  Despite the techno-title this acts like an ethernet port multiplier, and you just plug it in and let it do its job, no setup needed.  I'm using one with my mesh system.

But I would recommend you check that the Orbi is in access point mode, because if both hub and Orbi are in router mode it can cause all manner of speed and connection problems.

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