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Virgin media modems as rogue clients

I have a Cisco WLC 2501, and recently I've had a bunch of pings from a rogue "client". The rogue client in question is suspiciously named VM2937629, which is the SSID of a WiFi network near me, and has many different mac addresses. Is this something that has been noticed by anyone else? The WiFi on my modem is completely disabled in favor of Cisco gear to try to solve WiFi swamping issues. Even the Cisco gear is reporting abnormally high (Sometimes 100%) interference, which is causing blackouts.

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Alessandro Volta
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Message 2 of 10
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Re: Virgin media modems as rogue clients

Is it a neighbouring WiFi network you can see?

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Re: Virgin media modems as rogue clients

It appears to be, Yes. I'm still conducting research, as my results are very weird.
For example, Why is a neighboring WiFi network trying to connect to mine? And on so many mac addresses? I will be talking to the neighbours soon when I work out which ones it is, and asking them to contact Virgin Media for support.

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Re: Virgin media modems as rogue clients

The rogue client is just an adjacent network that is using hte same spectrum as your cisco wlan.  The fact that you can see the SSID from your property explains why your cisco unit is showing it as a rogue client..

it hasn’t “pinged” you - the cisco device is just detecting another wlan in range of itself that is usign the same spectrum.

this is used in corporate environments to detect unwanted wireless devices.. my view is that it’s nothing to worry about in your situation.  

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Alessandro Volta
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Message 5 of 10
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Re: Virgin media modems as rogue clients

Are you using powerline adaptors at all?

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Message 6 of 10
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Re: Virgin media modems as rogue clients

If that was the case, All of the other WiFi networks would appear here. I'm confused as to why only one is showing. I'm aware of other local wifi networks, most of them appear as rogue access points, but there is only one that appears to attempt to connect to my wireless LAN as a client. I'm pretty sure this cisco kit can tell the difference between a rogue AP and a rogue client connected. Something is very funky.

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and Gary, No. I have the opposite. WiFi controlled power switches. Everything else is Ethernet from the modem to every end machine. Our powerlines are far too noisy for those to work at above 10mb/sec. not ideal for a 350mb/sec connection 😞

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Superfast
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Message 7 of 10
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Re: Virgin media modems as rogue clients


@DrToxic wrote:

If that was the case, All of the other WiFi networks would appear here. I'm confused as to why only one is showing. I'm aware of other local wifi networks, most of them appear as rogue access points, but there is only one that appears to attempt to connect to my wireless LAN as a client. I'm pretty sure this cisco kit can tell the difference between a rogue AP and a rogue client connected. Something is very funky.

Capture.PNGCapture1.PNG


Have you opted out of 'Virgin Media WiFi' as this is used for anyone with a Virgin Media subscription to connect to your HUB, as a hotspot, for internet access. This is regardless of disabling your 'known' WiFi options in the HUB settings:

Unsure if 'Modem Mode' affects this functionality?

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Message 8 of 10
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Re: Virgin media modems as rogue clients

I've got that functionality turned off, too. I never could get Virgin Media WiFi hot spots to work from the mobile.
Side note: Aren't the virgin media hotspot networks called "Virgin Media"? I have a couple of those lingering about the local area.

I wish I could use Modem Mode, one of the VPN's I use to connect to a friend's network uses the 192.168.100.0/24 network, and in modem mode I can't adjust the subnet.

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Message 9 of 10
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Re: Virgin media modems as rogue clients

It isn't trying to connect to your network as a client.

The "Client", in this scenario, is a client on the "rogue" AP, not yours.

My best guess is that your neighbour has a wireless network with one or more powerline adapters (or other wireless network extenders) that provide wifi.  Based on the screenshot in your first post, there are two unique AP MAC addresses (ending in 4b and e9).

The MAC addresses listed in the far left column are those of the devices connected to those two APs, not yours.

If the rogue AP (and therefore client) was actually *on* your network, your WLC would classify it as "Malicious", rather than "Alert" irrespective of whether you have any RLDP rules configured.

you can read more about rogue detection here and WLC configuration here 

 

 

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Message 10 of 10
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Re: Virgin media modems as rogue clients

This makes some sense. I think I might end up having words. there are days where my interference graphs are through the roof. To the point where the AP's just give up providing a network until it's calmed down. I must admit, it's hella frustrating. Enough to come and ask for advice after a couple of years of dealing with it. The houses here are nowhere near big enough to warrant any extenders, the virgin modems alone can cover the entire house and some.

With my AP in the middle of the house, I can sit in the car on WiFi on the roadside and get a reasonable connection.... when it's working.

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