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Dale_Archer
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Add 2nd wireless router to Superhub 3

Hi,

Currently have a Superhub 3 using for Wireless and LAN connections to the TV etc. I am looking to add 2nd router connected by LAN cable to a Log Cabin at the end of my garden.

I have read various ways on forums on how to do this. 

Looking for the easiest and most cost-effective way and also not to reduce speeds 

Appreciate any advise.

 

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Andrew-G
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Re: Add 2nd wireless router to Superhub 3

Easiest way is to add a wireless access point (WAP) in the cabin.  In practice, a WAP is usually a normal wireless router but with its network control functions (called DHCP) turned off, because you can't have two routers fighting over DHCP.

This is a good bet, stick it in the cabin, when you configure it just select "Access point mode", give the network a name and a password and you're good to go (and you can use the spare ethernet ports to connect wired devices in the cabin).  There are faster and more capable devices to buy, but for a simple, cost effective solution the Archer C50 should work a treat.  Note that it would be a good idea to use weatherproof Cat 7 ethernet cable for a longish outdoor run.  

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jbrennand
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Re: Add 2nd wireless router to Superhub 3

As Andruser says....
You might also add a 1GB port, 4/6/8 port Ethernet unmanaged switch (Netgear ~£15 on Amazon) on the end of the new cable run to plug in the wifi access point - then that leaves you with >3 free ethernet ports in there for connecting "Mankit" (Smart TV, Games consoles etc) - which are always better connected on ethernet. You could also put one on the Hub if you are running low on ports.

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John
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I do not work for VM. My services: HD TV on VIP (+ Sky Sports & Movies & BT sport), x3 V6 boxes (1 wired 2 WiFi,) SH2 in modem mode with Airport Extreme Router +2 Airport Express's. On VIVID200, Talk Anytime Phone, x2 Mobile SIM only iPhones.
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Dale_Archer
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Re: Add 2nd wireless router to Superhub 3

Hi,

Thank you for the prompt reply. 

Just to clarify,

I can plug in the new cable from cabin to Spare port on the back of the Superhub. Then on other end plug in the recommended new WAP router you have kindly suggested? 

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Roger_Gooner
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Re: Add 2nd wireless router to Superhub 3

There are two quite different jobs here. The first is to get an Ethernet cable to your cabin, a seemingly easy task which has tripped up some people. You need a suitable cable, holes in the walls should be drilled at both ends in such a way as to reduce the possibility of water ingress, you don't want the cable to be strained or damaged, and it's neat to terminate the cable at an RJ45 wall plate. If it were me I'd get my electrician to do this job.

The second is expanding your network by setting up what is known as a LAN to LAN connection. Install the latest firmware an do a factory reset of your router to make sure the new usage takes effect.

Log into your router and change its IP address to one which is in the same range as your that of your hub. The hub's IP address is 192.168.0.1 and the default DHCP range is 192.168.0.10-192.168.0.254, so change the fourth octet (the number in the fourth box) to a different value such as 192.168.0.2 (which must be outside the DHCP range). The subnet mask must be the same as the hub's which is 255.255.255.0.

You must disable the DHCP server as you do not want the router to do routing functions, that's what the hub continues to do.

Finally, connect the router to the hub by an Ethernet cable using the LAN ports. When you power up the router, you should find that its LAN ports are active and it broadcasts WiFi.

--
Hub 3.0, TP-Link Archer C8, TP-Link TL-SG108S 8-port gigabit switch, V6
My Broadband Ping - Roger's VM Broadband Connection
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jbrennand
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Re: Add 2nd wireless router to Superhub 3

Roger is right of course for adding another router.
I was suggesting that the easiest thing is just to leave everything as is and after running the cable (properly!) just plug one end into a Hub port and on the other end - just add a cheapish "wireless access point" rather than complicate things with another "wirelesss router"


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John
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I do not work for VM. My services: HD TV on VIP (+ Sky Sports & Movies & BT sport), x3 V6 boxes (1 wired 2 WiFi,) SH2 in modem mode with Airport Extreme Router +2 Airport Express's. On VIVID200, Talk Anytime Phone, x2 Mobile SIM only iPhones.
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Roger_Gooner
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Re: Add 2nd wireless router to Superhub 3

If you have a spare router (as some do and I've accummulated a bunch of them over the years) then you can extend your network as I've posted at no cost, and a typical 4-port router will give you three ports in a LAN to LAN configuration. A WAP is a bit less work to set up but you may need a network switch as well if you want ports.

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Hub 3.0, TP-Link Archer C8, TP-Link TL-SG108S 8-port gigabit switch, V6
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Andrew-G
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Message 8 of 21
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Re: Add 2nd wireless router to Superhub 3

A personal view - what Roger_Gooner says makes sense and would give you a neat and professional solution, but if I might play devil's advocate, not to disagree, just to offer you additional options:

Any competent DIY'er can lay an ethernet cable, there's no need to pay a sparky for half a day's labour (£xxx round my neck of the woods) for simple data cable laying.  Personally I wouldn't bother with a wall plate - it's certainly neat, makes changing things easier, on the other that adds the need for a back box and wall plate that you've got to buy, fix and wire, and if you encounter problems later its another joint and component to have to test.  I'd just buy a one piece cable and run that between the VM hub and the cabin, making sure you know where it goes and (if buried) it is suitably deep, secure.  You could bury it in conduit, but that may need a wider trench, and may be an added cost luxury if you know for certain you won't put a spade through the cable.  If you're using a pre-terminated ethernet cable then you need to drill oversized (c14mm) wall holes to allow the plugs to pass through (cover them in electrical tape to keep 'em clean when installing), or you can spend about seven quid to buy an RJ45 termination kit on Amazon, cut the plug off one end, drill a smaller c8mm hole for the cable, and then put a new plug on the end of the cable (allowing some slack in case you need to take a few attempts to get it right).  Seal wall holes with either builder's silicone or expanding foam (a couple of quid at Poundland, for the odd small job much better value than DIY shops), stick the RJ45 plug into the WAP, turn on the power, going into settings and set to Access point mode, name the network and create a password, and that should all work.  If using expanding foam, make sure you protect any floor coverings or wall finishes with masking tape and newspaper, as it's a complete pain to completely remove from paintwork, wall cladding, carpets or feathers (don't ask!).

So that's Andruser's cheap and cheerful option for installing/bodging* a wireless access point in a garden office, undertaken at your own risk.  On a minor note of clarity, you probably don't need a separate ethernet switch in the cabin, because the WAP will have three spare ethernet ports.

* Delete as per your own view

EDIT: This post was sponsored by the English Punctuation Society's "Save the bracket" campaign.

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Tudor
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Message 9 of 21
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Re: Add 2nd wireless router to Superhub 3

Most Wireless Access Points do not have 4 Ethernet ports, although some do have one, so you would need a network switch if you needed more than one Ethernet device. What people are talking about with 4 Ethernet ports is really a home router with the router functions turned off so it only works as a bridge. This is not a Wireless Access Point although it does provide WiFi.


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Roger_Gooner
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Re: Add 2nd wireless router to Superhub 3


@Andrew-G wrote:

Any competent DIY'er can lay an ethernet cable


I won't trust most people to wire a plug, so I submit that competent DIY'ers represent a tiny proportion of the population.

--
Hub 3.0, TP-Link Archer C8, TP-Link TL-SG108S 8-port gigabit switch, V6
My Broadband Ping - Roger's VM Broadband Connection