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VOIP nightmare. No landline solution

cyberkev
On our wavelength

Virgin are today supposed to be installing an emergency phone today (3 hours ago). This is because we are vulnerable and the landline is being switched off next month.

The hub is 4 rooms away (in a utility room) from the master socket in the hall so running the master socket into the hub is impractical. The hub is in modem mode 2.5GB ethernet into pfsence in a server rack which is distributes via 10GB SFP+ ethernet to the switches around the house and cisco wireless infrastructure. I'm not moving the hub and a 48u rack into the living room or hall near the phone sockets !

I've been reading that the emergency phone is just a mobile with 8 hour battery life and uses the O2 network. There is NO O2 SIGNAL in our house.

So basically the only option is for the phone line to come into the original location where the cabling is in place from downstairs sockets, upstairs socket, fax machine, alarm system etc.

So basically I am wondering what they are going to do in this situation where the hub cannot be cabled across 4 rooms and the emergency phone is unusable without a mobile network ?  Will they be installing a socket fed from outside to the original socket location or will I be left without a phone ?

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@cyberkev wrote:

The packet for the Sim has O2 written on it, the sim is missing from the packet and in the phone, it's an O2 mobile number (which doesn't accept incoming calls). So despite the fact if you have a power cut at 10pm it'll be dead by 6am the next morning, there is no way for emergency services to return your call anyway as it doesnt work for incoming calls. Plus it barely has one bar of O2 signal here and keeps saying no signal. Useless.


Well the 8 hours refers to call time, not standby so a power failure at 10pm does absolutely not mean that it’ll be dead by 6am, it might be on about 90% full, but certainly usable. Also by regulations, calling the emergency services has to work on any available provider - so although it might be an O2 SIM, it’ll still connect to, say the Three network to make emergency service calls. Yes they probably won’t be able to call you back, but at least you can call for help.

Your idea for trunking a connection over a specific VLAN is clever, but won’t work, the hub is expecting a standard analogue connection into its TEL 1 port, nothing whatsoever to do with IP traffic - and there is nothing to do the required analogue to digital conversions at either end anyway.

So let’s think about it like this; right now, you have an external ‘omnibox’ on the outside wall and into this is a coax cable and a four core twisted pair cable for the (analogue) phone from underground. From this a coax runs to the hub and a ‘telephone’ cable runs to the existing master socket - so in theory the cables are all there, just not connected the way you need.

What you need is a visit from a VM tech who a) understands this and knows what they are doing; and b) can be bothered to do it and not fob you off. They push a four core-twisted pair cable through the existing hole where the coax to your hub comes in. This is terminated with an RJ-11 plug and connected to the Tel 1 socket on the hub. The other end of the cable is run around the outside of the house to where the Omnibox is, following the existing coax. Within the Omnibox, the connection to ‘outside’ is cut and the ‘new’ cable spliced into the existing telephone cable running to your master socket - yes not particularly elegant but it will work!

OK, issues; I understand that the REN on the hub’s socket is 3, so you may have problems if you have too many devices, secondly, some phone handsets no longer ring when connected to the hub. The reason is lack of a capacitor in the circuit to provide the current required to kick the ringer off - there are alternative adapters to what VM supply which contain said capacitor, or if you happen to have one of the old ADSL microfilters knocking about, then connecting one of those in the circuit should work.

Lastly, as mentioned above, seriously, a 48U comms cabinet? A bit overkill, no?

Pictures would be most appreciated😃

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26 REPLIES 26

goslow
Alessandro Volta

The VM tech will typically place a new phone socket next to your VM hub and then try to link that to an existing phone socket nearby. After that a lead is used to connect from the VM hub's phone socket into the newly-installed phone socket next to the hub and 'backfeed' the phone connection from the hub into the existing sockets.

Alternatively a new phone cable can be installed from the hub, following the route of the hub's coax cable, back to the omnibox outside and a joint made in there to the internal phone wiring.

If you happen to have any spare structured ethernet cables running around your home, they could possibly be repurposed (via leads/adapters) to patch the phone connection to another area of the home.

All of the above depends on your existing layout of cables in your home and how much new wiring modification you can accommodate. External cable routes could/should also be considered where possible to make the required connections.

A 48U cabinet for your home network is ... impressive!

Hi @cyberkev 

Welcome to back our community forums and sorry to hear you are having issues with your landline migration. We can understand the inconvenience caused and we want to best help. The landline switchover is a change being made by major internet service providers as the copper system will be out of use soon  https://www.futureofvoice.co.uk/ Our team will do their best to accommodate all circumstances. Was the great advice given by @goslow useful? Do you need any further help?

Thanks,

Akua_A
Forum Team

New around here? Check out the do's and don'ts, in our Community FAQs


cyberkev
On our wavelength

The technician has been and same as myself thought running a 45 meter RJ11 cable from the phone socket to the hub is impractical. Basically gave up and left.

The only solution is a phone line from the road into the original master socket to feed the 4 attached phones and alarm system which I dont think they can do.

cyberkev
On our wavelength

Not really.

The technician has been and same as myself thought running a 45 meter RJ11 cable from the phone socket to the hub is impractical. Basically gave up and left.

The only solution is a phone line from the road into the original master socket to feed the 4 attached phones and alarm system which I dont think they can do.

If they can convert the RJ11 analog on the back of the hub to a RJ45 ethernet on a vlan it could trunk over the 10GB SFP+ fibre network on the Juniper EX4300 near the firewall over 10GB connected switches to fairly close to a Juniper EX4300 switch near a slave socket but not the master socket and the convert IP back to an analog phone signal ! Basically their voip isn't really voip, its an analog port relying on a 45 meter RJ11 cable in this case.

goslow
Alessandro Volta

If 45m is the sort of distance involved then you may have to consider getting a local contractor (electrician, data/comm's tech, local computer tech etc.) to install the required cable for you in your home. A local installer will be able to engineer a solution to the problem which the VM tech won't be able to do (as the VM tech will be working to very basic standards of time, equipment, distances etc. to complete the job).

Rather than installing phone cable connections though, install some ethernet cable and use a patching kit to patch the phone service over the structured cabling. 

Worth noting that the REN of the hub's phone connection is 3 (so you might typically expect to have 3 devices connected and still have the phones ring). You could mitigate that with some cordless phones to replace some of your existing corded.

There isn't an option to connect your phone from the street under the post-switchover arrangements AFAIK.

cyberkev
On our wavelength

I've been thinking about it and the external virgin box is where the phone line comes in and 2 TV boxes and hub feed comes from, it currently goes across to the master socket externally. It's on the same side of the house as the hub just 2 rooms 28 meters away.

If virgin can drill a hole in the front wall on that side behind that external box and connect to where the old phone line comes in and give me a 28 meter RJ11 terminated cable inside the house to go into the hub I can run it through 2 rooms behind piano, tv cabinet, glasses cabinet etc to the hub.

REN would need to be 5 thinking about it, 3 phones, fax machine, alarm system.

There must be some option from the road to a master socket for customers with a virgin phone line and no broadband or TV ?

Not very impressed with the emergency phone they supplied, barely has one signal bar and cuts out as the O2 signal here is terrible, it's also impossible for emergency services to call you back in a power cut as the mobile number on the sim card doesn't ring for incoming calls. 8 hour battery life basically means you can go to bed, have a power cut and the next day have no phone service, not very emergency at all.

Roger_Gooner
Alessandro Volta

The EBUL battery is rechargeable, which is why the device should always be powered on. Furthermore my belief is that the SIM is an eSIM and can connect to any of the four mobile networks.

--
Hub 5, TP-Link TL-SG108S 8-port gigabit switch, 360
My Broadband Ping - Roger's VM hub 5 broadband connection

The packet for the Sim has O2 written on it, the sim is missing from the packet and in the phone, it's an O2 mobile number (which doesn't accept incoming calls). So despite the fact if you have a power cut at 10pm it'll be dead by 6am the next morning, there is no way for emergency services to return your call anyway as it doesnt work for incoming calls. Plus it barely has one bar of O2 signal here and keeps saying no signal. Useless.

goslow
Alessandro Volta

Which mobile providers do offer good coverage in your local area/home? Do you own a mobile phone?