Menu
Reply
  • 17
  • 0
  • 1
Chaff
On our wavelength
324 Views
Message 1 of 14
Flag for a moderator

Will Virgin Media consider adopting honesty as a policy?

Dear Virgin Media,

Would you ever consider reporting honestly on what broadband speeds prospective customers are actually likely to receive upon joining up at the point of sale?

Not that I'm accusing anyone of mis-selling of course or dishonestly selling a service but if it is well reported that the network is completely over-utilised (perhaps this is a complete surprise) and there is simply no spare capacity for new customers, is the best course of action really to **bleep** people off by telling them they can receive superfast 100mb, 200mb connections then supply them with less than 5% of that speed when they want to use it?

I mean it's great that we then get spammed with subsequent feedback surveys in which we can vent our frustrations by scoring you so low and promising never to recommend your services to another human being ever whilst absolutely nothing is done to rectify the poor service provided but a simple "you can't get 100MB in your area, we can offer a 25MB package for 75% less" would've been great.

Kind regards,
Chaff

 

 

  • 17
  • 0
  • 1
Chaff
On our wavelength
324 Views
Message 2 of 14
Flag for a moderator

Re: Will Virgin Media consider adopting honesty as a policy?

P.S. I'm thoroughly enjoying my superfast 100Mb broadband service and was able to enjoy a whopping 0.97Mb download speed during peak time. That's nearly 1% of the advertised speed! Neflix even gave up completely which if you think about it is a smart way Virgin Media can me money because now I can cancel that and Spotify and Playstation Plus because I can't really use them anyway.

0 Kudos
Reply
  • 408
  • 13
  • 141
JPL8
Fibre optic
311 Views
Message 3 of 14
Flag for a moderator

Re: Will Virgin Media consider adopting honesty as a policy?


Chaff wrote:

 

Dear Virgin Media,

Would you ever consider reporting honestly on what broadband speeds prospective customers are actually likely to receive upon joining up at the point of sale?

 


If they said yes, would you believe them? 🤔



"Cable broadband is typically faster than copper-based services, but a significant minority of users experience severe slowdowns in peak times." — Ofcom, UK Home Broadband Performance, November 2016
0 Kudos
Reply
  • 9.15K
  • 595
  • 2.52K
Superuser
Superuser
307 Views
Message 4 of 14
Flag for a moderator

Re: Will Virgin Media consider adopting honesty as a policy?

Just to put it out there you've 14 days to cancel with no penalty.

Overutilisation could take months or years to fix, so that's the option I would be going for. Just sayin.

 

 


0 Kudos
Reply
  • 17
  • 0
  • 1
Chaff
On our wavelength
302 Views
Message 5 of 14
Flag for a moderator

Re: Will Virgin Media consider adopting honesty as a policy?

Except that if you try to phone to cancel you get put on hold for 14 mins then cut off. Just sayin. Smiley Happy

Unfortunately it took muggins here at least14 days to realise the problem wasn't going to get fixed in a timely manner. Especially after I was told it was being looked into and I'd be updated the following month...

The point is they should've mentioned it if it was as bad as it is! Complaining to the ombudsman when I get round to it.

0 Kudos
Reply
  • 9.15K
  • 595
  • 2.52K
Superuser
Superuser
297 Views
Message 6 of 14
Flag for a moderator

Re: Will Virgin Media consider adopting honesty as a policy?

If its deffo overutilisation and your outside the 14 day window (silly you)

Phoning retention's and telling them you want to leave because of the issue should elicit a waiving of the EDF's, especially if you mention "deadlock letter " and "CISAS complaint"

 

 


  • 523
  • 19
  • 176
Bartman007
Rising star
274 Views
Message 7 of 14
Flag for a moderator

Re: Will Virgin Media consider adopting honesty as a policy?


Chaff wrote:

Dear Virgin Media,

Would you ever consider reporting honestly on what broadband speeds prospective customers are actually likely to receive upon joining up at the point of sale?

Not that I'm accusing anyone of mis-selling of course or dishonestly selling a service but if it is well reported that the network is completely over-utilised (perhaps this is a complete surprise) and there is simply no spare capacity for new customers, is the best course of action really to **bleep** people off by telling them they can receive superfast 100mb, 200mb connections then supply them with less than 5% of that speed when they want to use it?

I mean it's great that we then get spammed with subsequent feedback surveys in which we can vent our frustrations by scoring you so low and promising never to recommend your services to another human being ever whilst absolutely nothing is done to rectify the poor service provided but a simple "you can't get 100MB in your area, we can offer a 25MB package for 75% less" would've been great.

Kind regards,
Chaff

 

 


They are supposed to let everyone know if the area has problems according to OFCOM: Codes of practice:

 

"Under the voluntary code of practice on broadband speeds, Internet Service Providers (ISPs) agree to give clear information on broadband speeds to consumers when they consider or buy a home broadband service, and to provide redress when speeds performance is poor. Ofcom and ISPs have agreed a revised code which came into effect on 1st October 2015.

Links to the revised code, and a plain English guide for consumers are provided below.

List A shows those ISPs who have confirmed that they have now implemented and are signed up to the 2015 Code. ISPs who have signed up have agreed to abide by the principles and spirit of the Code. This does not guarantee compliance but we expect signatories to commit to honour the letter and spirit of the Code. We will monitor compliance with the Code using measures such as ongoing mystery shopping.

List B below shows those ISPs who informed us, at the time of implementation of the revised 2015 voluntary Code of Practice or at a later stage, that they want to sign up to the Code once they are compliant with the requirements.

If you are an ISP and would like to sign up to the voluntary 2015 Code of Practice, please email Celia.Pontin@ofcom.org.uk

List A

BT
Sky
Virgin Media
KC
EE
Talk Talk
Vodafone
Zen Internet
List B

Hyperoptic
Plusnet
InTouch Systems
The Co-op
Post Office"

It looks like Vm has taken voluntary to the letter, or OFCOM's mystery caller in on VM's payroll Smiley Tongue

 

Regards






----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------




All the information I provide is available on Google Search, I just make it simple for you Smiley Happy
  • 2
  • 0
  • 1
kartal
Joining in
245 Views
Message 8 of 14
Flag for a moderator

Re: Will Virgin Media consider adopting honesty as a policy?

After years of good service from NTL/Virgin I am seeing the same problems as Chaff and its been going on since Nov 16.

I am so upset and fedup with the service being provided by Virgin, I can not comprehend why they are adding new subscribers to over subscribed lines and then alienating new customers (Chaff) and existing customers (Me) and forcing us to look elsewhere.

Absolutely rubbish and I too feel virgin should be more honest. I am paying for 200Mb and getting 7Mb if I am lucky. Super frustrated.

0 Kudos
Reply
  • 9
  • 0
  • 2
Thwaker
Tuning in
231 Views
Message 9 of 14
Flag for a moderator

Re: Will Virgin Media consider adopting honesty as a policy?

Hi 

If your service is unacceptable and doesn't meet the minimum usable level - you have the right under the ISPA voluntarily code of conduct to exit the contract in advance without penalty.

Look at the Ofcom complaints procedure, the below might help.

In cases where you have been without the service for some time, you may also have the right to leave the contract without penalty- there may be a term in your contract saying you can do this if your provider has failed in its obligations to you or breached a key condition. If the broadband speeds you are receiving are significantly below the original estimate your provider gave you, you may have protections under the voluntary Code of Practice that covers most internet service providers.

If Virgin Media fails to respond - Raise a complaint then you can follow Virgin's Own complaint procedure (look here)

  • 17
  • 0
  • 1
Chaff
On our wavelength
227 Views
Message 10 of 14
Flag for a moderator

Re: Will Virgin Media consider adopting honesty as a policy?

Thanks for this, I endeavour to follow the complaints procedure first but it's useful to know there is another route after exhausting this. I really don't want to get stung with early cancellation fees either but at the moment I can get a faster connection via my mobile phone on 4G during peak times than I can with my wired Broadband connection and that's pushing me to leave asap.
0 Kudos
Reply