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j-cookson
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Multiple routers

I currently have virgin broadband using a 3.0 hub. It sits in the front of our house (just a 3 bed semi) and the wifi signal is poor. I have recently had the house electrics rewired and got 2 new ethernet sockets installed in the ground floor to help improve my wifi signal. Could someone please advise what product i need to use. I assume i need to buy a new router for each socket. I asked virgin but they advised the wifi socket boosters (£3 a month charge). I know thus isnt correct as this uses electric sockets. I was advised i could buy any router but dont trust the advice i was given. Thanks a lot for your help

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Tudor
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Re: Multiple routers

What you need is Wireless Access Points. I use Ubiquiti ones with great success. Even one may suit you needs, but without any plan of your home and tests for signal strength it’s impossible to say. Do an Internet search.


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Superuser
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Re: Multiple routers

Where exactly are these sockets? If there’s one close to where the Hub is, you connect an Ethernet cable from the Hub to the socket, you then need a wifi access point (strictly speaking a router will work but you’re asking for trouble), plugged into the second socket (hopefully this one is at the other end of the house) and that will broadcast out a wifi signal from there as well as the hub.

There’s actually quite a few ways of doing this sort of thing but it depends on what exactly you are trying to do and where these sockets are - I presume the sockets have been properly connected together with cat-6 cables.

John

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j-cookson
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Re: Multiple routers

Thank you John. Yes these have been connected with Cat-6 cables. At present the the virgin connection comes into the front of my house (living room) where my router is based. This is close to our neighbour's wall (i.e. at one end of the house). I have had installed a new socket in the rear of the house (kitchen/living room/diner)  - again near the neighbours wall - and also and in our office (old garage). So hopefully this way i can cover all ears of the house and erase all blank spots. 

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Superuser
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Re: Multiple routers

I see, the problem here is that the two Ethernet sockets which you have had fitted aren't going to be of much use to you where they are. Your internet connection,as you know comes in via the Hub, which you can think of as being three (arguably four) different boxes all doing one job each, all contained within the Hub itself. First is the cable modem part which takes inbound feed and converts it into a form suitable for network equipment, second is the router which (among other things) allows you to have more than one device connected to the internet at once, and lastly is the wifi access point which broadcasts out the actual wireless signal to be received by your phones etc.

Now the cable modem part of the Hub is perfectly adequate, it's a fair enough but nothing to write home about router as long as you don't try to do anything too advanced with it, but the wifi component, for reasons which remain a bit of a mystery, seem to not be as good as other manufacturers and do appear to be the cause of many users' issues. What many of us do is to put the Hub in modem mode which disables or bypasses all but the first 'link' in the chain, no routing feature, no wifi, you provide your own router (generally with wifi) and many people find that perfectly acceptable for most houses.The router you supply for yourself has to be connected with a single Ethernet cable to the Hub which realistically means it has to be physically quite close and thus may not always provide sufficient coverage due to the layout of the house.

An alternative is to keep the Hub in the normal router mode but switch off the wifi features on it and then you need to get your own wifi access points. Because they are purely looking after the wifi provision they are often cheaper and/or provide a better wifi experience - but they need to be connected somehow back to the Hub (technically referred to as the backhaul provision) to pass the connection back from whatever device is wireless connected to them back to the Hub/router and out to the internet. So although you can get two access points and connect them to the Ethernet sockets, there's no link back to the Hub for them to talk across.

This is where the VM 'wifi boosters' are aimed, they are access points but use the electric mains wires as their backhaul connection - but these often have issues in themselves, electrical interference, vagaries of how your ring mains have been wired etc. the performance never, ever meets what might be claimed on the box!

So in your case, I'd be tempted to get a good third party router (there's plenty of advice around as to what to get), put the Hub in modem mode and try it. You might well be surprised of how good a job they can do in getting wifi provision around the house. Failing that a meshed wifi system would probably be the next step. Unfortunately, unless you can get the electrician back to install more Ethernet sockets and have them all wired back to a single point, I can't see an easy way in which the two existing sockets will help you much.

Best wishes

John

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Roger_Gooner
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Re: Multiple routers

You need to run an Ethernet cable from the hub to the nearest socket (I presume you mean an RJ45 wall plate). From here on I can think of two options: run another cable from the hub to the second socket or connect a gigabit network switch to the first socket and run a cable from the switch to the second socket. However you do it you'll need to get the electrician back.

The good news is that once you've got both sockets working it's all downhill. I would connect a gigabit network switch to each socket and plug into the switch either a router or wireless access point for WiFi as well as other devices such as games controllers, TV box, TV, laptop, etc.

--
Hub 3.0, TP-Link Archer C8, TP-Link TL-SG1008D 8-port gigabit switch, V6
My Broadband Ping - Roger's VM Broadband Connection
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