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Solitaire1
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Sharp practice!

Sharp practice - £150 insurance excess on a under warranty faulty phone, £324.99 to terminate my contract then you were going to charge we £15.32 for the unlock code on my 'ancient' yet reliable Blackberry!! 

Unbelieable. How do you guys sleep at night?! 

😡😡😡😡😡😡😡😡

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Solitaire1
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Re: Sharp practice!

Hi Gorf, thanks for posting your comment.
I've had the handset just 10 weeks and it's the second model I've had with a fault. The first phone sent for repair, Virgin lost/destroyed. This replacement phone has liquid damage apparently. The phone has not been misused or experienced any accidents as described in your list. Nor has it been any where near water. But it has been in my kitchen whilst cooking, in the bathroom whilst having a shower (not in the shower with me), and been close to my mouth as that's how one normally talks to people when using a phone. If doing those 3 activities has deemed it to have liquid damage, then I would assume that anybody who sends a faulty phone in for repair, they will also here those useless, unhelpful employees at Virgin say 'the damage is not covered by the warranty'.
My advice to anybody out there is, don't take out a monthly contract as you're tied into it for 24 months, paying over the odds for the phone, and then when there is a fault, Virgin refuse to accept liability. Buy a phone and go for SIM only.
The regulators are putting pressure on mobile phone providers to offer better service, seems Virgin still have a way to go. But rest assured, Ofcom and CISAS will ensure their sharp practise will be investigated.
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jhuk
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Re: Sharp practice!

WTEEF is that?

 

I have read a post similar here and going by the prices VM offer for trading in handsets no wonder its a joke.

 

You would be cheaper to buy a phone and then sell on after use if you want to keep to latest Gen or say every 2nd Gen.

 

My Moto X Gen cost like £400, I got it far cheaper and they sell for £230+ easy on EB 2nd hand, VM will give you £20-30 for one but I think that is the Gen1 2013.

 

My phone is unlocked and Moto will allow you 3 screen repairs per handset free AFAIK (not 100% on full details)

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HughJarsse
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Message 3 of 7
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Re: Sharp practice!


Solitaire1 wrote:

Sharp practice - £150 insurance excess on a under warranty faulty phone, £324.99 to terminate my contract then you were going to charge we £15.32 for the unlock code on my 'ancient' yet reliable Blackberry!! 

Unbelieable. How do you guys sleep at night?! 

😡😡😡😡😡😡😡😡


Can't help with the first two, but regarding the unlocking, Have sent you a private message..Smiley Wink 

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Superuser
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Re: Sharp practice!

How long have you had the handset? If it's less than six months you shouldn't be talking about insurance excesses or warranties.  A handset that is suffering from an inherent problem (i.e. it's not the result of misuse) should be getting sorted via the sale of goods act.

 

Accept nothing less - don't be fobbed off by talk of warranties unless it's been between six months and one year since you got the handset. Don't be fobbed off with insurance unless you tried and failed to root the phone or dropped it in the loo or dropped it from a height onto a hard surface or drove over it in an antique Land Rover.

 

(All the above have happened in this house - the last one was my contribution to the list.)

 

If you have misused the handset - the old (pre-Freestyle) insurance is worth exactly what you paid for it. If you think the excess is bad, wait 'til you see the exceptions!

 

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Solitaire1
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Message 5 of 7
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Re: Sharp practice!

Hi Gorf, thanks for posting your comment.
I've had the handset just 10 weeks and it's the second model I've had with a fault. The first phone sent for repair, Virgin lost/destroyed. This replacement phone has liquid damage apparently. The phone has not been misused or experienced any accidents as described in your list. Nor has it been any where near water. But it has been in my kitchen whilst cooking, in the bathroom whilst having a shower (not in the shower with me), and been close to my mouth as that's how one normally talks to people when using a phone. If doing those 3 activities has deemed it to have liquid damage, then I would assume that anybody who sends a faulty phone in for repair, they will also here those useless, unhelpful employees at Virgin say 'the damage is not covered by the warranty'.
My advice to anybody out there is, don't take out a monthly contract as you're tied into it for 24 months, paying over the odds for the phone, and then when there is a fault, Virgin refuse to accept liability. Buy a phone and go for SIM only.
The regulators are putting pressure on mobile phone providers to offer better service, seems Virgin still have a way to go. But rest assured, Ofcom and CISAS will ensure their sharp practise will be investigated.
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disgruntledvirg
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Re: Sharp practice!

My 3G usage is approaching its limit for the month ... So ... Guess what? My broadband becomes non-functional so I am forced to use 3G at home ... Presumably the idea is to force me to spend extra to get my 3G limit for the month increased
Sharp practice indeed Virgin!
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spell
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Message 7 of 7
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Re: Sharp practice!

Solitaire1

While it is wrong to jump to conclusions this water damage claim does seem to get 'trotted out' very conveniently.

In fact you appear to know that there was no such damage.

It is for yourself to decide on how far to take this but there does seem to be a lot of money for nothing involved.

If you are confident enough that this explanation is suspect I would certainly be challenging it and requiring the phone be returned for an examination by the manufacturer/independent expert (they should even be able to establish if any water damage was introduced at a later stage).

It would be interesting if VM denied you access or claimed the phone was lost or disposed of.

Bear in mind Citizens Advice would assist with your problem - good free independent advice online.

If you turn out to be correct in your suspicions as Gorf said you are already covered for a replacement under Consumer Law which most large companies ignore as much as possible. 

 

Good luck with it

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