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jockb01
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Insurance conundrum

Hey All

Had a text recently from Virgin Mobile saying they were improving my insurance.  The phone currently insured, at the time 2 years ago insurance was part of the overall phone cost, is out of contract and I was thinking about upgrading.  Looking at all the new phones in the same quality and price bracket I am accustomed to have NO added insurance as previous, and therefore has to be bought at £8 month, thus adding that cost to the phone. 

I have had cause to use the insurance previously, particularly for incurable software glitches, that were no fault of my own and got a replacement phone.  This will no longer be the case as I will have to pay for these no fault occurences.

My query then is - Presumably all phones are warrantied for the first year for failure and software failures (excluding accidental)?  So in order to be insured for the second year of contract is when I need to buy thye insurance?

I have also noticed that there are more tarrifs.  The tarrif I am currently on is now middle and costs an extra £3 month.  Coupling this with the £8 month insurance is £11 more than I am currently paying.  I am accustomed to be paying £20 month with insurance and tarrif, this will now be more than £30 - half as much again.  If I opt for this my phone would have to come down to the £9 bracket.  Is there one?

 

What do I do???

Regards JockB

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Superuser
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Message 7 of 10
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Re: Insurance conundrum


jockb01 wrote:

To Gorf if he's reading

Based on your first response that states new phones have a 24 mnonth warranty, and your second response that states you still require insurance, what does the insurance provide over and above the warranty?, Because therein lies my conundrum, if I'm basing my phone tenure on a fixed price and lop off the price of insurance; the only phones I can afford will be of lesser quality than the one I currently have.


Further to Ben's quote - the insurance covers you for all the things that the warranty doesn't.

 

You don't "require" insurance. It's up to you. It was enabled for free by default a couple of years ago, but it was a mockery really because if ever you needed to claim on it, the excess was more than the phone's value. Now, if you want it, you pay for it. I got it free with both my Virgin handsets - never needed it, wouldn't have claimed on it if I'd broken my phone, and wouldn't pay for it if it was offered now.

 

You don't even require a warranty.  Retail law assumes that if a fault shows up in a purchased new item, then it's an inherent manufactured fault and the retailer must sort it out or prove that it's the result of misuse. After six months and up to six years, it's up to the consumer to prove that any faults are inherent.

 

If something goes wrong with your handset in the first six months, take a photo of the water damage markers and send it off for a replacement. Only accept a repair the manufacturer's website lists Virgin as an authorised repair centre.

 

Warranties and insurance are additional to your statutory rights. A warranty in particular is an attempt to divert the responsibility for any problems away from the retailer and on to the manufacturer. It makes sense - the manufacturer is usually better placed to put problems right, however you have your contract with the retailer and legally the manufacturer has no contractual responsibility to you.

 

 

I don't understand the second part of your post. I don't think that insurance is included in the prices shown (I could be wrong), but even if it was, surely if you took off the few pounds per month premium, that would make the better phones a little more affordable?

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Superuser
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Message 2 of 10
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Re: Insurance conundrum

Virgin phones have a two-year warranty unless they are iPhones or reconditioned handsets.

 

I seem to recall that rooting the phone or putting your own ROM on it invalidates the warranty, which suggests that the stock firmware and any official upgrades are covered by the warranty.

 

Problems caused by the stock firmware are inherent faults and are covered by the sale of goods act. If you can't get it dealt with via warranty, you have your statutory rights as a safety net.

 

The repair centre staff have a very "unique" interpretation of your consumer rights.

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jockb01
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Message 3 of 10
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Re: Insurance conundrum

Been on my hols so late reply, but this poses a very simple question.  Barring accidents, do I need to buy insurance on a new upgrade phone?

Regards Jock B

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Superuser
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Message 4 of 10
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Re: Insurance conundrum

Yes.

 

Virgin still use Asurion for their insurance, but it's no longer free. You pay a premium which is two, four, six or eight pounds depending on the value of the handset. The excess is ten times the premium. The cover is better than it used to be, and you don't have to have their terribly mobile rescue application installed any more to cover loss or theft.

 

You can choose another provider of your own, or you may even be covered by your household insurance.

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jockb01
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Message 5 of 10
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Re: Insurance conundrum

To Gorf if he's reading

Based on your first response that states new phones have a 24 mnonth warranty, and your second response that states you still require insurance, what does the insurance provide over and above the warranty?, Because therein lies my conundrum, if I'm basing my phone tenure on a fixed price and lop off the price of insurance; the only phones I can afford will be of lesser quality than the one I currently have.

Regards Jock B

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Superuser
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Message 6 of 10
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Re: Insurance conundrum


jockb01 wrote:

what does the insurance provide over and above the warranty?


http://store.virginmedia.com/virgin-media-mobile/insurance.html

 

Virgin Media Protect gives worldwide cover to protect your phone against:

 

  • Loss & theft
  • Accidental damage (including cracked screens and liquid damage)
  • Malicious damage
  • Pet damage
  • Out of warranty breakdown
**********************************
I work for Virgin Media - but all opinions posted here are my own
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Superuser
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Message 7 of 10
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Helpful Answer

Re: Insurance conundrum


jockb01 wrote:

To Gorf if he's reading

Based on your first response that states new phones have a 24 mnonth warranty, and your second response that states you still require insurance, what does the insurance provide over and above the warranty?, Because therein lies my conundrum, if I'm basing my phone tenure on a fixed price and lop off the price of insurance; the only phones I can afford will be of lesser quality than the one I currently have.


Further to Ben's quote - the insurance covers you for all the things that the warranty doesn't.

 

You don't "require" insurance. It's up to you. It was enabled for free by default a couple of years ago, but it was a mockery really because if ever you needed to claim on it, the excess was more than the phone's value. Now, if you want it, you pay for it. I got it free with both my Virgin handsets - never needed it, wouldn't have claimed on it if I'd broken my phone, and wouldn't pay for it if it was offered now.

 

You don't even require a warranty.  Retail law assumes that if a fault shows up in a purchased new item, then it's an inherent manufactured fault and the retailer must sort it out or prove that it's the result of misuse. After six months and up to six years, it's up to the consumer to prove that any faults are inherent.

 

If something goes wrong with your handset in the first six months, take a photo of the water damage markers and send it off for a replacement. Only accept a repair the manufacturer's website lists Virgin as an authorised repair centre.

 

Warranties and insurance are additional to your statutory rights. A warranty in particular is an attempt to divert the responsibility for any problems away from the retailer and on to the manufacturer. It makes sense - the manufacturer is usually better placed to put problems right, however you have your contract with the retailer and legally the manufacturer has no contractual responsibility to you.

 

 

I don't understand the second part of your post. I don't think that insurance is included in the prices shown (I could be wrong), but even if it was, surely if you took off the few pounds per month premium, that would make the better phones a little more affordable?

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jockb01
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Message 8 of 10
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Re: Insurance conundrum

Thanyou for response, I think I can make a decision based on this.  Just to point out however, the cost of insurance is not included now, and phones in the order of £20- £25 month have an £8 month insurance premium, so it is not insignificant.  When the insurance was "free", Virgin made great stock of the fact that it was worth £7 month.  I have used the insurance a couple of times and was never asked for a penny in excess.  So it was good value - then, but to add £8 to my monthly charge - not so.

Jock B

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jb66
Alessandro Volta
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Message 9 of 10
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Re: Insurance conundrum

A nationwide flexaccount works out better value than phone insurance I found

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Superuser
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Message 10 of 10
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Re: Insurance conundrum

I'm amazed you were not asked to pay an excess - back when insurance was free, the excess was either £75 or £150 depending on the handset.

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