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stevedh2
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Networking nostalgia

Anyone remember 10Base2 networks ?

The one with the T shaped BNC's that conected to the network card and chained all the computers together and would go down regularly and require checking all the connections and terminators to see if one's come undone or got loose, sort of like Christmas tree lights.

 

 

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vircom
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Message 2 of 11
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Re: Networking nostalgia

But at least you could set up and administer your own small network without having to rely on an IT department.
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Superuser
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Message 3 of 11
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Re: Networking nostalgia

Isnt DOCSIS an evolution of 10BaseT?

 

 


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stevedh2
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Re: Networking nostalgia

Hmm not sure if they are related, although they use a similar medium, and 10BaseT was used by some cable suppliers a while ago.

And from memory, when we 1st started using Ethernet we didn't have a DCHP server so all ap addresses had to be set by hand, which was quite fun managing Smiley Happy

 

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Superuser
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Message 5 of 11
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Re: Networking nostalgia

1st actually networked machines I encountered were on 10 BaseT- UNIX and RM Nimbus  Smiley Happy obviously a LAN set up. usually VERY local i.e one room or maybe 2 at a push...

At the same time acoustic couplers were on the go so you could remote in to a BB or such , kind of the start of WAN

But getting a LAN and a WAN talking, that was the realms of fantasy....or CISCO certified engineers , which in a small town technical college may as well have been fantasy...

DHCP=Star Trek technology in those days LOL

 

 

 


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Tudor
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Message 6 of 11
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Re: Networking nostalgia

What about Token Ring, beat 10Base2 hands down. Also SNA, did a lot of coding with that, on 3705/6.


There are 10 types of people: those who understand binary and those who don't
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Timwilky
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Message 7 of 11
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Re: Networking nostalgia

Back in the mists of time:- 1981, My first networking was a star network comprising an Acorn Atom  acting as a file server to Rockwell AIM65 clients that were being used for data logging and basic process control. A very cheap alternative to the PDP11 system that I could never get my hands on as too expensive to take out of the computer room and into the lab. All custom code/interfaces developed in conjunction with the UK Micro processor development council as standards were still evolving back then and the UK actually thought we might need to get interested in this sort of technology

next :- I was working on a suite of programmes for BT for the management of their payphone systems including a comms system to transfer data from regional counting centres to BT head office by MODEM/accoustic couplers. With a colleague we worked out scenarios, holding up boards with Ack/Nak etc as we tested before hitting the macro assemblers. But after a few months something went wrong at two sites. Canterbury and Brighton. Everywhere else worked. Weeks of debugging and I still cannot find the problem with my code. Then it hits me. There is nothing wrong. it must be a configuration change. But examining the file, there is no change.

In desperation  phone the Cantebury number (modem remember)  and get a pre recorded "Cantebury 5 figure numbers have now been upgraded to 6 by prefixing a 6 to the number". great! a config tweak and it works. So check out Brighton. The line is dead. Report it to BT and get told it has been cut off for non payment. Great BT cuts of BT.

So forward a couple of years and I installed a network using 10Base5 (thicknet) with Bridge communications terminal servers using the xerox XNS protocols before we moved over to TCP/IP and even successfully obtained a class B network allocation which we still use today as a far larger global enterprise. I even went over to China to install similar on a power station project. My other colleagues were implementing "Broadband" with Sytek kit as they had noisy factory environments and used to talk channels, head ends. But what was missing back then were wide area networks.

 

In my case we were trying to connect terminals to computers, the network was simply a method of replacing lots of RS232 cables and allowing switching between the terminal and multiple target. so for the wide area we had terminal servers providing RS232 connectivity to Case multiplexers between sites. But as someone had spent a fortune on the multiplexors and BT leased lines it took an effort to get them kicked out and bridges between sites put in.

 

Wonderful when BT brought out SMDS and I didn't need to think about network loads as with x25 etc and simply install ACC routers  and get inter site connectivity. Until my new boss decided he wanted his beloved Novell PC network which wasn't using IP. So out go the ACC and in come Cisco routers. But we are now also using VSAT to link voice/data in China, Phillipines back to the UK. All IP. But still inter site.

 

But my boss with his Novell network did one thing right for the time. He set up email and had a server dialing up his internet service provider to push/pull email. So when he left. I inherited an internet account. Marvelous. OK dial up. but there was more than just email.Especially as I had a  Mosaic browser on my workstation. You kids today don't know how lucky you are.

 

Oh the happy days of networking, When you actually needed to know what you were doing.

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Ignition
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Message 8 of 11
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Re: Networking nostalgia

Remember that stuff vaguely.

Delighted that we've left it behind and, alongside getting faster and more reliable, networks are far more usable.

The focus on networks in general now is in simplicity, which is a really good thing. Local networks have been relatively simple for a while, WANs are getting the same treatment with SDN and SD-WAN.

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tweetiepooh
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Message 9 of 11
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Re: Networking nostalgia

Oh I remember that cabling and the fun we had when someone removed the T-piece and plugged the coax directly into the card.  The joy of trying to see why the connection worked, then didn't.  Trying to talk an engineer (I think he was a telephone engineer) through tracing the cable and describing what should be there.

Didn't we laugh trying to find a terminator and T-piece to sort the issue.

If you do what you've always done, you'll get what you've always got. Jim Elliot

I work for Virgin Media but respond here on an individual basis. No comment or assistance offered is done in any official capacity.
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stevedh2
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Message 10 of 11
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Re: Networking nostalgia

For some reason our networks were unreliable and I remember having to work my way around it conection by connection with a terminator to try and find the fault.

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