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Wynford
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Unresponsive broadband

Hi. I've got the latest hub and have the fastest available broadband. However, watching TV on my laptop includes buffering every few seconds. Internet searches sometimes halt and I have to wait minutes for something to happen.

My hub is in a bedroom and I use the laptop downstairs. I've discussed this a few times with VM and they've tested the line in. VM tells me that this hub arrangement should be fine as it isn't far away: but it isn't. Should I get it moved, as the intermittent service is driving me crazy? Or could it be something else?

Wyn

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backtothefuture
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Re: Unresponsive broadband

It sounds as though it is the distance between the router and your devices that maybe causing the problem.

Are you able to test the laptop upstairs where your router is? - Does it work perfectly when you are close to it ?

-

If I have helped please feel free to give 'Kudos' by clicking on the thumbs up icon against any of my posts. If I have helped to solve an issue you can also click on the 'Mark As Helpful Answer' link to mark it as helpful.
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Superuser
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Re: Unresponsive broadband

There is a lot more than distance that can affect wireless signals, like obstacles, interference from neighbouring Wireless networks and domestic appliances to the positioning of your hub and wireless clients. Wireless can be quite complex and you will need to understand a few basic principles to get the best out of your wireless.

The first diagnostic step would be to ignore the wireless for the time being and test the internet connection with a device connected directly to the hub by ethernet cable. I would test during the day and again during the evening peak to check for contention issues.

If your wired speed is fine all the time then it does look like the wireless signal is responsible for the buffering.

Positioning the hub (and wireless clients) is important. The Hub should ideally be placed in an central, open location away from obstacles and electrical devices. On the bedroom floor or on a low table could improve the signal downstairs. Wireless clients also need to be away from obstacles and electrical devices.

I would bear in mind wireless signals propagate from the hub in a predominantly horizontal direction, so the strength of the wireless signal will be weaker in the vertical plane. (Think Donut)

Obstacles will also attenuate the wireless signal, everything from walls, floors, furniture, floors ceilings, carpets human beings etc. etc.

Wireless Interference is a very common problem especially on the narrow 2.4GHz band. The 5Ghz band is wider with non-overlapping channels so does not tend to be affected by interference as much as the 2.4Ghz band. However, the 5Ghz band tends to have a slightly shorter range.

To try to dodge most of the interference you could try changing the wireless channel manually. Downloading a wireless scanner like InSSIDer for Windows or WiFiAnalyser for Android would help by showing you the surrounding wireless networks, the channels they are broadcasting on, and their signal strengths, so you can select the best wireless channel.

Bear in mind that the wifi scanner will not show interference from other sources of wireless interference such as A\V streaming devices, Baby monitors, Chordless phones, Microwave ovens, Plasma TVs, Security systems, etc.

Setting the Hub's radio setting to 300Mbps (or 40Mhz channel) is not advised on the 2.4GHz band as it takes up over half of the available spectrum, making it prone to wireless interference.

Once you have optimised your wireless signal and the wifi scanner is showing a weak signal (below roughly -67dBm) then the wireless signal needs to be extended.

There are two ways you can do this. A decent third party router with the Hub in modem mode should give you a much better overall wireless signal around the house, but whether it will be strong enough to prevent buffering will depend on your wireless environment and the topography of your home.

The alternative would be to use Powerline adapters bearing in mind that actual speeds will be around 15 - 25% of advertised and will depend on the condition of your home's electric circuits. These tend to work well to improve wireless in wireless deadspots.


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backtothefuture
Fibre optic
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Message 2 of 4
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Helpful Answer

Re: Unresponsive broadband

It sounds as though it is the distance between the router and your devices that maybe causing the problem.

Are you able to test the laptop upstairs where your router is? - Does it work perfectly when you are close to it ?

-

If I have helped please feel free to give 'Kudos' by clicking on the thumbs up icon against any of my posts. If I have helped to solve an issue you can also click on the 'Mark As Helpful Answer' link to mark it as helpful.
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Superuser
Superuser
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Message 3 of 4
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Helpful Answer

Re: Unresponsive broadband

There is a lot more than distance that can affect wireless signals, like obstacles, interference from neighbouring Wireless networks and domestic appliances to the positioning of your hub and wireless clients. Wireless can be quite complex and you will need to understand a few basic principles to get the best out of your wireless.

The first diagnostic step would be to ignore the wireless for the time being and test the internet connection with a device connected directly to the hub by ethernet cable. I would test during the day and again during the evening peak to check for contention issues.

If your wired speed is fine all the time then it does look like the wireless signal is responsible for the buffering.

Positioning the hub (and wireless clients) is important. The Hub should ideally be placed in an central, open location away from obstacles and electrical devices. On the bedroom floor or on a low table could improve the signal downstairs. Wireless clients also need to be away from obstacles and electrical devices.

I would bear in mind wireless signals propagate from the hub in a predominantly horizontal direction, so the strength of the wireless signal will be weaker in the vertical plane. (Think Donut)

Obstacles will also attenuate the wireless signal, everything from walls, floors, furniture, floors ceilings, carpets human beings etc. etc.

Wireless Interference is a very common problem especially on the narrow 2.4GHz band. The 5Ghz band is wider with non-overlapping channels so does not tend to be affected by interference as much as the 2.4Ghz band. However, the 5Ghz band tends to have a slightly shorter range.

To try to dodge most of the interference you could try changing the wireless channel manually. Downloading a wireless scanner like InSSIDer for Windows or WiFiAnalyser for Android would help by showing you the surrounding wireless networks, the channels they are broadcasting on, and their signal strengths, so you can select the best wireless channel.

Bear in mind that the wifi scanner will not show interference from other sources of wireless interference such as A\V streaming devices, Baby monitors, Chordless phones, Microwave ovens, Plasma TVs, Security systems, etc.

Setting the Hub's radio setting to 300Mbps (or 40Mhz channel) is not advised on the 2.4GHz band as it takes up over half of the available spectrum, making it prone to wireless interference.

Once you have optimised your wireless signal and the wifi scanner is showing a weak signal (below roughly -67dBm) then the wireless signal needs to be extended.

There are two ways you can do this. A decent third party router with the Hub in modem mode should give you a much better overall wireless signal around the house, but whether it will be strong enough to prevent buffering will depend on your wireless environment and the topography of your home.

The alternative would be to use Powerline adapters bearing in mind that actual speeds will be around 15 - 25% of advertised and will depend on the condition of your home's electric circuits. These tend to work well to improve wireless in wireless deadspots.

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Forum Team (Retired) Adam_L
Forum Team (Retired)
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Re: Unresponsive broadband

Hi Wynford, 

Thanks for getting in touch to let us know about your unresponsive broadband. I apologise for any inconvenience caused.

I have tested things from here and I couldn't see anything out of the ordinary, no errors or time outs inside the Hubs logs and all of the power levels are within the preferred ranges.

Are you still having these issues? If so, when do you notice them all times of day or just specific times? 

Is there any noticeable changes to the Hubs light sequence when these issues occur?

Also, what type of connection do these issues occur on, wired or wireless?

Please respond to me here and I'll look into this further for you.

Take care, 

Thanks, 

Adam.


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