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deans6571
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Is my Network Any Good (inSSIDer screen shot)?

So just downloaded inSSIDer and this is a pic of its results based on my 100mb cable connection:

 

inSSIDer pic.PNG

 

Not entirely sure what all the results mean but can somebody decipher the above screen grab and tell me what it all means?!  Am I getting the best results from my Superhub 1 connected to VM's own D-Link 615 router?

I've also just done a speed test over wifi (from my iPad Air 2) and its given me a 66Mb Download score and 6Mb Upload.

I think thats pretty good isn't it?!

 

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Superuser
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Re: Is my Network Any Good (inSSIDer screen shot)?

On the 2.4Ghz band overlap, each channel is spaced  5Mhz apart , whilst the wireless channel is 20Mhz wide.

You have the SH set on the 300Mbps mode which uses two wireless channels bonded together to form a 40Mhz wide channel. Although using a 40Mhz channel can double the throughput it makes it more prone to wireless interference as you can see from the graph you are using over half of the available spectrum.

As you can see you are overlapping with 4 other networks and have 9 networks on the same channel(s).All of which will have some impact on your signal (hence the 50 link score) Most Apple devices do not allow using the channel bonding on the 2.4Ghz band, so you may not see much benefit setting the hub to 300Mbps mode. the 144Mbps mode may prove slightly better.

Networks on the same channel do not degrade your signal as much as networks on overlapping channels. This is due to co-channel coexistence software on the 2.4Ghz band which will back off transmission if it senses another network transmitting on the same channel. So it is generally  better to keep to the popular "primary" non overlapping channels of 1, 6, and 11, using  one channel.

66 Mbps is a pretty good speed in that environment as you say.

As said above, you would probably get faster speeds using the 5Ghz band fairly close to the router as you will be able to use the 40Mhz channel without interference from other networks.

 

 

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Superuser
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Re: Is my Network Any Good (inSSIDer screen shot)?

Yes, in a nutshell.

Obviously this will not be possible in your wireless environment, so the priority would be t look for a channel which gives zero overlapping channels as they do more damage that cochannels.

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Sephiroth
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Re: Is my Network Any Good (inSSIDer screen shot)?

If that's still your current inSSIDer picture, the on 2.4GHz, channel 6 is clear. (anything in red does not interfere).

If the SH1 settings for Wireless were set to Auto, then if properl;y implemented in the firmware, the SH1 should have found channel 6 at each hub reboot.

Seph - ( DEFROCKED - My advice is at your risk)

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Re: Is my Network Any Good (inSSIDer screen shot)?

As @Sephiroth has alluded to, the correct channel for you can vary according to the channels being used by your neighbours.

There are two approaches:

1. Check inSSIDer and choose a better channel;

2. Use Auto in your settings and just re-boot if you are concerned about wifi performance.

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Sephiroth
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Re: Is my Network Any Good (inSSIDer screen shot)?

The signal strength of those SSIDs that include channel 6 are so low (-86dBm and -87dBm) that they won't impose on you if you select channel 6.

In my opinion (and my profession is in this realm), any signal better than -82dBm can impose on a stronger signal.

(Note that -70 is a stronger signal than -80).

Seph - ( DEFROCKED - My advice is at your risk)


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Superuser
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Re: Is my Network Any Good (inSSIDer screen shot)?

It basically tells you that your wifi signal is the strongest around you but there are many more in your immediate location, many of which are running on the same channel as you.

Why are you still on Superhub 1? You should, at least, consider a newer Superhub (2, 2ac or 3), all of which can run both the 2.4GHz and 5GHz wifi bands at the same time.

Your iPad Air 2 is capable of using the 5GHz wifi band and this will allow you to move away from the congested 2.4GHz wifi band and get better performance, much nearer to the 100Mb capability of your connection.

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deans6571
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Re: Is my Network Any Good (inSSIDer screen shot)?


Ernie_C wrote:

It basically tells you that your wifi signal is the strongest around you but there are many more in your immediate location, many of which are running on the same channel as you.

Why are you still on Superhub 1? You should, at least, consider a newer Superhub (2, 2ac or 3), all of which can run both the 2.4GHz and 5GHz wifi bands at the same time.

Your iPad Air 2 is capable of using the 5GHz wifi band and this will allow you to move away from the congested 2.4GHz wifi band and get better performance, much nearer to the 100Mb capability of your connection.


...thanks, for the above Ernie_C - appreciated. Smiley Wink

 

The only reason I am still on Superhub 1 is purely because these forums are littered with people complaining about ALL the Superhubs (other than my Superhub 1!!) saying that they keep resetting to factory defaults?!  I don't wanna jinx myself just yet, seeing that my Superhub1 has been running 100% fine for over a year!!

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Superuser
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Re: Is my Network Any Good (inSSIDer screen shot)?

Remember this is generally a place where people come to talk about problems, not the excellent operation of their service.

Given your iPad Air 2, I would speak to Retentions about getting a Superhub 2ac.

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deans6571
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Re: Is my Network Any Good (inSSIDer screen shot)?

Just looking at my screenshot in my original post, why does my channel say 11 and 7 (in the Channel column at the top) and yet, the blue lines of my network, actually go down to channel 5 and 13 (in the bottom where it shows all the bands)? 

Smiley Indifferent

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Re: Is my Network Any Good (inSSIDer screen shot)?

On the 2.4Ghz band overlap, each channel is spaced  5Mhz apart , whilst the wireless channel is 20Mhz wide.

You have the SH set on the 300Mbps mode which uses two wireless channels bonded together to form a 40Mhz wide channel. Although using a 40Mhz channel can double the throughput it makes it more prone to wireless interference as you can see from the graph you are using over half of the available spectrum.

As you can see you are overlapping with 4 other networks and have 9 networks on the same channel(s).All of which will have some impact on your signal (hence the 50 link score) Most Apple devices do not allow using the channel bonding on the 2.4Ghz band, so you may not see much benefit setting the hub to 300Mbps mode. the 144Mbps mode may prove slightly better.

Networks on the same channel do not degrade your signal as much as networks on overlapping channels. This is due to co-channel coexistence software on the 2.4Ghz band which will back off transmission if it senses another network transmitting on the same channel. So it is generally  better to keep to the popular "primary" non overlapping channels of 1, 6, and 11, using  one channel.

66 Mbps is a pretty good speed in that environment as you say.

As said above, you would probably get faster speeds using the 5Ghz band fairly close to the router as you will be able to use the 40Mhz channel without interference from other networks.

 

 

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deans6571
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Re: Is my Network Any Good (inSSIDer screen shot)?

Thanks for that - very helpful. 

So would it be better to choose channels whereby the Co-Channel figure on the right, is zero and also the Overlapping figure on the right, is also zero (or as low as possible)? 

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Re: Is my Network Any Good (inSSIDer screen shot)?

Yes, in a nutshell.

Obviously this will not be possible in your wireless environment, so the priority would be t look for a channel which gives zero overlapping channels as they do more damage that cochannels.

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deans6571
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Re: Is my Network Any Good (inSSIDer screen shot)?


griffin wrote:

Yes, in a nutshell.

Obviously this will not be possible in your wireless environment, so the priority would be t look for a channel which gives zero overlapping channels as they do more damage that cochannels.


Thank you for that - appreciated. 

Smiley Happy

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keithdunnett
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Re: Is my Network Any Good (inSSIDer screen shot)?

FWIW you are running into a throughput limit on the router. I ran a DIR-615 from the 10Mbit days, through 30Mbit, and for some weeks after I got 100Mbit; it topped out at ~70Mbit of throughput (that's wired) with everything unnecessary (QoS, firewall, etc.) turned off, latest DD-WRT at the time. Tweaking your wireless isn't likely to get you much improvement from there - or at least, test with a wire and see if this is the problem.

Not especially recommending this particular model over others (it's good enough but a year or two old now, just an example), replacing it with a Netgear R7000 (also running DD-WRT) gave enough clout in the router to handle the new line speed. It does 150Mbit fine, too, over a wire.

Wireless speed will depend on the standard used at both ends; you'll have more space in the 5GHz spectrum and clients supporting 802.11ac (incl. most modern phones, tablets) should manage the full line speed. 2.4GHz clients can in theory, but many older ones won't. I've an old laptop that connects at notionally 300Mbit but has a wireless throughput of around 40Mbit. The wireless controller in a friend's Xbox 360 has a similar limitation; for anyone who has one, downloads can be speeded up substantially by plugging in an Ethernet cable. 

To sum up: your throughput should be getting on for 50% faster on a wire with a newer router, which is likely to be a factor in why you're only getting that speed. Wirelessly, though, stick in a new router and the limitation will be what older wireless clients support. Essentially, you're using what's by now a £15 router on a connection that can make use of a £70-£150+ router if you want the full connection performance.