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Stemac50
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Facetime issues with Hub 3

Recently i had a V6 installed in the living room with a new Hub Internet, recenty we had issues connecting around the house, at times it will disconnect with various however it has sort of been solved by seperating the GHz of 2.4 and 5. However i bought abooster of a TP-Link AC750 and it has brought the signal up abit however now i have issues with Facetime, each room i seem to lose connection especially from going upstairs to downstairs. The main Issues is with Facetime it keeps reconnecting when i enter rooms in my house and especially upstairs it can hold the connection upstairs but not very good. At times it will say call failed and im really annoyed because theres times where i dont even move my phone and it still reconnects the facetime. Can anyone help why?
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andyjstew
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Re: Facetime issues with Hub 3

Hi Stemac50,

Just a thought but this could perhaps be caused if your phone is "handing-over" between your Hub3 and your TP-Link booster?

You could test by turning off the booster and testing face time where your phone get a strong signal from the Hub3 on it's own?

 

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Stemac50
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Re: Facetime issues with Hub 3

We tried multiple times disconnecting the booster and it seems upstairs has a low signal and it affects by going past the stairs at certain times it stay connected but once I stay close it sometimes loses it even with the booster off
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Superuser
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Re: Facetime issues with Hub 3

Wireless reception is affected by many factors like Range, Client hardware, the Topograpy of your home, and the big killer, Wireless interference.

First of all, I would ensure the Hub is placed in a central, open position, away from obstacles and electrical devices. It would be worth checking the connection with a device connected directly to the hub, just to check it is not the internet connection that is dropping and not just the wireless dropping.

You could try changing the wireless channel manually. Downloading a wireless scanner like InSSIDer for Windows or WiFiAnalyser for Android would help by showing you the surrounding wireless networks, the channels they are broadcasting on, and their signal strengths, so you can select the best wireless channel. Bear in mind that the wireless scanners will not pick up interference from other sources such as A\V streaming devices, Baby monitors, Chordless phones, Microwave ovens, Plasma TVs, Security systems, etc.

Setting the Hub's radio setting to 300Mbps (or 40Mhz channel) is not advised on the 2.4GHz band as it takes up over half of the available spectrum, making it prone to wireless interference..Using the wider, usually less congested 5Ghz band could help, if your client devices support it.

The SHs are basic entry level devices that can sometimes struggle to provide a decent wieless coverage in certain environments with the wireless signal propagation being hampered by obstacles such as walls floors, doors furniture, ceilings, carpets etc. etc.(not withstanding wireless interference) It is worth noting wireless signals are about 30% weaker in the vertical direction (think Donut) .

A decent third party router may allieviate the situation somewhat, but might not completely resolve the problem, depending on the many variables involved.

Another solution would be to supply additional wireless access points to boost the signal in hard to reach places. I see you have got yourself a wireless booster. These do not tend to work well as the booster need to receive a decent signal to relay, the strength of the signal the repeater receives will affect how far the signal can be "boosted". They will also halve the wireless speeds due to the half duplex nature of wireless. So positioning of the booster is critical.

Another way, would be to provide a wireless access point upstairs wired back to the hub. This is a far more reliable way to extend the wireless signal. If wiring the access point back to the router is problematic then powerline adapters could provide a more convienient solution.

If you give the hub and access points the same SSID and security credentials, then mobile devices should be able to move from one access point to the next seamlessly.





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Stemac50
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Re: Facetime issues with Hub 3

I appreciate the suggestions you've mentioned, the issue is the hub where it is in the front room at the front of the house and its behind a TV for it to be connected to the V6 box. There is no central places I can go with it with no electrical devices being in the way. How much usually is a power Lin adapter? I heard they're really good and could do if its best to get one or not because the booster we had is really bad. I even lost connection fully on my phone in the kitchen just then when the internet is 2 rooms away

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Superuser
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Re: Facetime issues with Hub 3

Sounds like a typical "quick" installation by VM (or more than likely a subbie installer), as behind the TV is about the worse place they can place the hub, for wireless propagation.

It is unsurprising that your phone would have dropped wireless in the kitchen considering the distance from the hub and the obstacles like walls obstructing the signal not withstanding any potential wireless interference. Kitchens tend to be quite RF noisy environments.

Poweline adapters would bypass the problem of the hub being behind the TV by using your home's electrical circuits to convey the signal to the powerline adapter.

Another option would be to put the hub into modem mode and get a decent third party wireless router and place it in a central position and wiring it back to the hub by ethernet cable. This may give a better overall coverage than the poweline adapter, but it is impossible to say from the remote position of the forum.

There is a review of powerline adapters here. Bear in mind that the actual speeds will be around 15 to 25% of adverised. I would go for a passthrouh type of powerline adapter if free electrical sockets are at a premium.

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