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frough
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Message 11 of 17
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Re: Concrete walls and wi-fi!!!!

Stupid question, what do you mean a switch and wireless access point?

Checked the wi-fi analyser in my room (1 brick wall away from the router) between -60-70 in my son's (2brick walks away) between -80-90. Is that good??

Limited interference I think as i can see a talk talk signal (must be my neighbours) but it's on another channel.
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stevedh2
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Message 12 of 17
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Re: Concrete walls and wi-fi!!!!

A switch is what you use to connect multiple network leads to a single source.. google network switch.

A wireless access point is what you'd put on the end of an ethernet cable to provide another wireless source.

Alternatively you could use an router, but make sure it has gigabit ports. you'd have to change some settings in it, bit most routers can act as wirelss access points (thats what I have done, as they tend to be cheaper).

 

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Superuser
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Message 13 of 17
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Re: Concrete walls and wi-fi!!!!

Basically a switch allows to to connect several wired devices to a single LAN port on the hub.

A Wireless Access point provides a wireless connection for wireless devices which is relayed back to the Hub through a ethernet connection.

When you think about it the Hub is a switch and a wireless access point rolled into one device, 4 LAN ports to connect 4 wired devices to the internet and a wireless access point to provide a wireless connection to the internet. A second wireless router will probably do the same job as a switch and a Wireless access point.

The signal in your room is barely acceptable, you may have issues with streaming if the signal falls below -67dBm

The signal is very poor in your son's bedroom way below -67dBm and on the edge of the receiving threshold of most wireless clients.

Wireless channels overlap on the 2.4Ghz band, so if the Talk Talk router is at least 5 channels away from your channel it will not affect your signal and only slightly affect it if on the same channel. You still need to be mindful of domestic appliances that can cause interference especially on the 2.4Ghz band like A\V streaming devices, Baby monitors, Chordless phones, Microwave ovens Plasma TVs Security systems, Wireless controllers etc. etc.

The material of the walls will have a big difference on signal strength, brick is less of an obstacle than concrete. The signal strength certainly needs improving, but not as much as I originally thought, maybe a decent third party router with the hub in modem mode may improve it enough.

Placing the Hub in a central, open position away from obstacles and electrical  devices can help the signal strength

 

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Roger_Gooner
Fibre optic
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Message 14 of 17
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Re: Concrete walls and wi-fi!!!!

People usually baulk at drilling through walls or ceilings to run Ethernet cabling, but any competent builder or electrician can do this. I'd terminate both ends with an RJ45 face plate. It's a one-off job and your son will get the benefit for as long as he's there.

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stevedh2
Knows their stuff
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Message 15 of 17
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Re: Concrete walls and wi-fi!!!!

alternatively you could run it around the skirting board, or you can even get flat ethernet cable you could stick under the carpet..

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VMCopperUser
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Message 16 of 17
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Re: Concrete walls and wi-fi!!!!

Laugh, typed this early yesterday and forgot to hit "post"... So I thought eh...

What powerline adaptors do you have?

Your correct in that running Ethernet wouldn't solve the WiFi device issues he may have in his room.  For the wired things a simple 8 port switch can be had for £10-£20 and that would bump you up to 7 wired devices in his room (this is what I did in my sons room).  An access point will be more expensive but would give him his own wifi signal.  I may be wrong in thinking Ethernet cables are not typically UV resistant, so if you do go outside then be sure to buy something that works.  A quick search on amazon found a 20 meter outdoor one for under £9, but like you say holes in walls and all that jazz.

I would definitely use a face plate on the internal walls because they are typically robust enough to mean that an accident tripping on the network cable will not result in the whole line being broken, usually just the ends of your patch cables (Ethernet that goes from wall box to device).

 

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I do not work for VM, but I would. It is just a Job.

I would also make websites for them, because the job never seems to require the website to work.

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Tudor
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Message 17 of 17
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Re: Concrete walls and wi-fi!!!!

Obviously I do not know the layout of your house, a Wireless Access Point, as suggested, may not necessarily be needed in his room. It could well work just placed centrally upstairs and this may make running CAT5e/6 cable a lot easier. For reference maximum distance for CAT5e/6 cable is 1000ft or 305m. 


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