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squig007
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Alternative router

I'm getting in the 200mbps broadband in . I know I can set the hub to modem mode and use a router but I'm unsure can I use any router or does it have to be a cable router
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pmk_mck
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Re: Alternative router

The term "cable router" is used to describe routers which connect to the modem using an ethernet cable. The term differentiates them from xDSL routers, where it's possible to replace the ISPs DSL modem with a third-party router which as a modem built-in.

But it's not possible to use any other vendors modem on Virgin, just the one Virgin supply. But as you rightly point out, you can use modem-only mode, and then use a third party router.

Anyway. Often the type of router you're looking for will say in it's description "...use with either DSL or cable connections". It connects to the Super Hub using an ethernet cable. You'll be needing a router with WiFi too IF you've WiFi devices too btw, because when in modem-only mode the WiFi on the Super Hub is effectively disabled.

Choosing a router comes down to a few simple choices: budget, the types of wireless clients, WiFi coverage, the number of wired ports required, throughput and latency. At one end of the spectrum there are sub £20 WiFi routers such as 'NETGEAR WNR2000-200UKS', and at the other the 'NETGEAR R8000-100UKS Nighthawk' coming in at around £200.

I've only provided links to suitable Netgear routers, when I myself run 2x high-end ASUS WiFi routers (RT-AC87U and an RT-AC68U) in my house, and would you like to know why? Well because I've found the ethernet switches within the ASUS routers to be unreliable when there are many devices on the network. So I use just one ethernet port on each of the ASUS routers, and then use separate (external) ethernet switches to deal with the network load. The WiFi capabilities of the ASUS are very very good, but again to get reliability they're running custom firmware which didn't come from ASUS, and even though they can route, I don't use that capability in them, that's done by another device. For me, I've invested in the 2x ASUS, but if either of them dies they'll be replaced with either Netgear or Linksys.

I've used TP-Link WiFi routers in the past and didn't have great success or network reliability, same for Belkin.

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pmk_mck
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Re: Alternative router

That ASUS looks pretty serious. I"d think it suitable for applications where there are many wireless clients, many, or if throughput and minimal latency were key. That said, my next WiFi router won't be ASUS, it'll be Linksys or Netgear. 

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pmk_mck
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Re: Alternative router

The term "cable router" is used to describe routers which connect to the modem using an ethernet cable. The term differentiates them from xDSL routers, where it's possible to replace the ISPs DSL modem with a third-party router which as a modem built-in.

But it's not possible to use any other vendors modem on Virgin, just the one Virgin supply. But as you rightly point out, you can use modem-only mode, and then use a third party router.

Anyway. Often the type of router you're looking for will say in it's description "...use with either DSL or cable connections". It connects to the Super Hub using an ethernet cable. You'll be needing a router with WiFi too IF you've WiFi devices too btw, because when in modem-only mode the WiFi on the Super Hub is effectively disabled.

Choosing a router comes down to a few simple choices: budget, the types of wireless clients, WiFi coverage, the number of wired ports required, throughput and latency. At one end of the spectrum there are sub £20 WiFi routers such as 'NETGEAR WNR2000-200UKS', and at the other the 'NETGEAR R8000-100UKS Nighthawk' coming in at around £200.

I've only provided links to suitable Netgear routers, when I myself run 2x high-end ASUS WiFi routers (RT-AC87U and an RT-AC68U) in my house, and would you like to know why? Well because I've found the ethernet switches within the ASUS routers to be unreliable when there are many devices on the network. So I use just one ethernet port on each of the ASUS routers, and then use separate (external) ethernet switches to deal with the network load. The WiFi capabilities of the ASUS are very very good, but again to get reliability they're running custom firmware which didn't come from ASUS, and even though they can route, I don't use that capability in them, that's done by another device. For me, I've invested in the 2x ASUS, but if either of them dies they'll be replaced with either Netgear or Linksys.

I've used TP-Link WiFi routers in the past and didn't have great success or network reliability, same for Belkin.

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squig007
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Re: Alternative router

Great advice thanks was thinking of this one what do you think :https://www.asus.com/uk/Networking/RT-AC5300/
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pmk_mck
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Re: Alternative router

That ASUS looks pretty serious. I"d think it suitable for applications where there are many wireless clients, many, or if throughput and minimal latency were key. That said, my next WiFi router won't be ASUS, it'll be Linksys or Netgear. 

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