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arlowood
On our wavelength
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Message 1 of 12
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Email sign in problems on Chrome browser

Since Friday I have been experiencing problems accessing my emails using my normal Chrome browser.

I have a bookmark for the sign-in page and that will not load properly - it just seems to spin endlessly before I get a time out massage. If I log in to My Virgin Media, I can access my account details with no problem but if I click on the Email tab at the top of the page the same thing happens - no access.

I have tried using Internet Explorer and I seem to be able to get access using that browser - tho again it is not perfect. I have had the same issues on occasion with IE.

I had one of these Windows 10 updates installed on Friday and my feeling is that the problems started after that installation.

My question is - are others experiencing problems with accessing their emails using Chrome? Is it possible that the Windows 10 update has caused this issue or is it just a coincidence? 

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boogiemoog
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Message 2 of 12
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Re: Email sign in problems on Chrome browser

also on explorer

Nothing lasts forever....
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arlowood
On our wavelength
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Message 3 of 12
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Email access problems on Chrome browser

Since the end of last week I have been unable to access my emails using the normal bookmark I have in my Chrome browser. When I click on the bookmark I don't get the sign in page - the PC just seems to be spinning endlessly. Sometimes I get a time out message or a Service Unavailable message.

I can access my account OK on the My Virgin Media website but if I click the Email tab at the top of the page the same thing happens.

I have tried using Internet Explorer and this seems to work OK although I have occasionally had access problems on IE.

This issue seems to stem from the installation of a Windows 10 update package last Friday so I'm not sure if the update is to blame or if there is another fault with the email system.

Any help or comments appreciated

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Superuser
Superuser
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Message 4 of 12
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Re: Email sign in problems on Chrome browser

Why do I need to "clear cache and cookies?" in my browser.

Why do we ask you to do this? -

To deal with issues like “Forbidden” or getting stuck in a never ending loop of “robot” or “three dots” when accessing Virgin Media (web)Mail.

One of the most frequent steps in problem resolution is to clear the cache and cookies from the browser. It’s understandable why this might come over as only a slightly more technical version of "have you tried turning it off and back on again?" - but it isn't! It's actually an important first step for almost any troubleshooting procedure.

The Cache

This is a tool used by your internet browser to speed up the page loading process. Any element that appears on multiple pages within a single site - for instance, the image file representing a site's logo - will be placed in the browser's cache. This is really just a local folder on your hard drive that stores a copy of frequently-accessed page resources. Because it's faster to load an image from your hard drive than it is to download it from a remote server, the browser just goes back to the cache every time it needs to display the logo when you surf to a new page. This saves not only the time needed to download the image file, but it also conserves network bandwidth. Caches are a very effective way to make browsing the web faster, more convenient and less aggravating.

Cookies

These are also files which are saved on your hard drive. Instead of representing content that's displayed on a website though, they represent settings selected by the individual person who's using the browser. For instance, if a user browses to a website, signs into their account, and selects the "remember me" option, then the next time the user visits that site, they won't have to type in their username - the site will 'remember' it because the user's preference to do so was written into a 'cookie' file that was saved on their computer's hard drive. Any time a site asks a user to select preferences, there's a good chance those preferences will be saved in a cookie.

The Wikipedia definition says -

Cookies are arbitrary pieces of data, usually chosen and first sent by the web server, and stored on the client computer by the web browser. The browser then sends them back to the server with every request, introducing states (memory of previous events) into otherwise stateless HTTP transactions. Without cookies, each retrieval of a web page or component of a web page would be an isolated event, largely unrelated to all other page views made by the user on the website. Although cookies are usually set by the web server, they can also be set by the client using a scripting language such as Javascript (unless the cookie's HttpOnly flag is set, in which case the cookie cannot be modified by scripting languages).

The cookie specifications require that browsers meet the following requirements in order to support cookies:

  • Can support cookies as large as 4,096 bytes in size.

  • Can support at least 50 cookies per domain (i.e. per website).

  • Can support at least 3,000 cookies in total.

So why is it sometimes a problem to keep the cache and cookies around? Because sites change and develop over time. When a site is updated, the files saved in the cache may conflict with what's actually coded into the website. As a very simplified example, consider a file called "VM-logo.jpg" in the cache. Obviously it will represent the logo for the website - VM in this case - but what happens if the website undergoes a redesign? The NEW logo is also saved to the site with the file name "VM-logo.jpg," but since the original version of "VM-logo.jpg" is already stored on the user's cache, the browser may not be able to tell the difference. It could very well detect that the site calls for "VM-logo.jpg" and return the cached version of the OLD image instead of the new one downloaded from the server. Similarly, data that's stored in a cookie can rapidly become outdated when a site is modified. If the site changes the location of a piece of data within a cookie, retrieving data from “Field 5” may produce the wrong answer if it picks it up from an old cookie (and I know that website coders should check the version of the cookie first – but many of them do not). If your browser can store up to 3000 cookies, including multiple versions of the cookies from your most-frequently-accessed sites, it’s easy to see how the wrong version of a cookie can be picked up.

Depending on what files are stored in the cache for a given website, caching errors can be fairly broad in scope. If a logo file is cached, the error could be limited to simply displaying outdated content. But if one of the files that controls “how the website operates” is cached, then the end user can see some unexpected, strange behavior. The length of time that a file remains in the cache varies; some browsers have controls allowing users to dictate how long cached files are kept around before the browser decides they're outdated and need to be refreshed.

Having a user clear their cache and cookies when we are troubleshooting an issue is a way to ensure that we're seeing the same version of a website as the person we're working with, rather than the version modified by a multitude of different cookies lying around in the user’s cookies folder.

How do you clear your cache and cookies? Instructions for individual browsers all differ so Google them thus – “Clear xxx browser cache and cookies”.

If anybody claims - “I haven’t changed anything since date X”, they are almost certainly mistaken because if they have logged into practically ANY website since date X, then at the very least they will have picked up a new cookie or two.

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Seffrid
Superfast
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Message 5 of 12
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Re: Email sign in problems on Chrome browser

I have just tested the email sign in on my Chrome Browser and had no problems, although I only access the webmail page very infrequently to check the spam entries for anything I should have seen, otherwise I still find Windows Live Mail much more effective especially given that I only access emails on my desktops. Note, however, that I am using Windows 7 and not Windows 10 which may be the key to your problem. Also, there was a recent update to Chrome so it may be that update (or possibly a failure to install it) rather than the Windows Updates that is causing your issue.

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arlowood
On our wavelength
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Message 6 of 12
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Re: Email sign in problems on Chrome browser

Cleared cookies and cache in Chrome and that seems to have fixed the problem.

Spoke to my son who is pretty savvy in IT matters. He reckons that the Virgin email platform must be badly configured. He has never had any of his email providers require cache and cookie clearance to allow them to function

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Superuser
Superuser
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Message 7 of 12
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Re: Email sign in problems on Chrome browser

If you had looked at previous posts on these issues you would have that with a unanimous voice we have been saying that the first step is to clear cache and cookies to solve many of these connections issues. VM web mail is highly problematic at the moment so these issues are not uncommon.

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Superuser
Superuser
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Message 8 of 12
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Re: Email sign in problems on Chrome browser


arlowood wrote:

Cleared cookies and cache in Chrome and that seems to have fixed the problem.

Spoke to my son who is pretty savvy in IT matters. He reckons that the Virgin email platform must be badly configured. He has never had any of his email providers require cache and cookie clearance to allow them to function


I'd actually have to agree with his assessment.

@ForumTeam - Can you ask the email team to look into just what is going on with your platform that causes this?

________________________________________


Only use Helpful answer if your problems been solved.

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coenoby
Fibre optic
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Message 9 of 12
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Re: Email sign in problems on Chrome browser

Hi arlowood

I think it would be useful if you ask your son about the options you have to set up a new email account with a dedicated (and free!) email service rather than a flakey ISP based email service such as VM. I am sure he could give you some useful advice.

In the short term it my be inconvenient to change your email address but it will mean less stress and wasted time in the long run. In any case, your VM address will still be there but you won't be relying on it.

Just a thought.

Coenoby

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Lewlew
Dialled in
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Message 10 of 12
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Re: Email sign in problems on Chrome browser

I had this last week, cleared cookies, cache, etc. Fixed it that one time. Now it spins and spins for a good part of the day. All other sites are fine. Gmail? No problem.  Ugh. Well at least I am getting a new hub on Friday!!!!

But I would like to see my BY emails tomorrow on VM webmail.   Smiley Sad  Lew

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