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CFarrell1996
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Virgin cabinets

Just wanted to know are these virgin cabinets they have been recently installed and usually they look like this? https://imgur.com/a/qK9p0
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Superuser
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Re: Virgin cabinets

That's Fibre (narrowtrench) build, which may explain the lack of large ducting acces covers. (The ducting ends in a box called a "TOBY". Don't ask what it stands for.)

su1718.jpgCable customer since 1993. Services: FH TV, Sky Sports & Movies (2xV6), Talk Anytime Phone, VIVID 350, Virgin PAYG Mobile

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Re: Virgin cabinets


Ignition wrote:


The build surrounding me would've probably been FTTP had it come later, however at over 10,000 premises passed all in one area where there was previously nothing calling it an infill is perhaps a stretch.

RFoG will never be used where infill is extensions of existing nodal areas and generally doesn't make sense unless the build is fairly large. For obvious reasons it requires a fair bit more transmission equipment to power optical transceivers for each 32 premises passed rather than each 500, and the CPE is more expensive as HFC's termination into the home is passive, while FTTP requires on ONT. The cost savings can also be relatively limited where there is a lot of block paving and carriageway work to do.


That is where I can certainly disagree. We have infill going in here on my doorstep in Hemel. Small cul-de-sac's with a handfull of houses are going in as narrow trench RFoG straight onto the existing HFC cabs in the adjoining roads. Yet similar infill down the road (an older Private road that may have been on the original plan) is going in with the normal HFC size trenching & large cabinets.

su1718.jpgCable customer since 1993. Services: FH TV, Sky Sports & Movies (2xV6), Talk Anytime Phone, VIVID 350, Virgin PAYG Mobile


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Superuser
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Re: Virgin cabinets

No idea, there should be a manhole cover adjacent to the cabs, if they are VM thet will be stamped CATV.

If there are no Manhole covers there you could trace the trench scar back to a Manhole cover.

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Re: Virgin cabinets

I think they are 2 of these:

VMSD1 – 535 W x 985 H x 315 W Distribution/Amplifier Cabinet 1 per 30 homes max.

If you really want to check them out try measuring their dimensions. 


There are 10 types of people: those who understand binary and those who don't
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Superuser
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Re: Virgin cabinets

These might be used in fibre delivery areas, but not in HFC. The ones used in HFC areas are double that size.

su1718.jpgCable customer since 1993. Services: FH TV, Sky Sports & Movies (2xV6), Talk Anytime Phone, VIVID 350, Virgin PAYG Mobile

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CFarrell1996
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Re: Virgin cabinets

May I ask what HFC is? Also, around the outer parts of town there are the bigger cabinets, from looking online they serve 3,000 homes per 1? There is 3 of these big cabs so I guess they're the 'bigger' ones you was on about. Oh yeah forgot to say also where the trenches were made , there are virgin media cable duct things, don't know what the actual name is but each property has one outside of it branded 'Virgin Media'.
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Re: Virgin cabinets


CFarrell1996 wrote:
May I ask what HFC is? Also, around the outer parts of town there are the bigger cabinets, from looking online they serve 3,000 homes per 1? There is 3 of these big cabs so I guess they're the 'bigger' ones you was on about. Oh yeah forgot to say also where the trenches were made , there are virgin media cable duct things, don't know what the actual name is but each property has one outside of it branded 'Virgin Media'.

Hybrid Fibre Coaxial, which is the historic method of providing cable services (Fibre to a street node, then coaxial cable via multiple "slave" cabinets to customers). HFC cabs also incorporate telephone distribution systems. HFC is now only used in new build where original plans exist but build was never completed. New build areas & not previously planned infill are now installed as RFoG (Radio Frequency over Glass), where fibre goes to a powered Omni-box on the front of the customers house that converts Fibre to Coax for internal distribution.

su1718.jpgCable customer since 1993. Services: FH TV, Sky Sports & Movies (2xV6), Talk Anytime Phone, VIVID 350, Virgin PAYG Mobile

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CFarrell1996
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Re: Virgin cabinets

Does this image help? The cable thing (don't know the name) has the virgin media logo on it. https://imgur.com/a/EFTx7
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Re: Virgin cabinets

That's Fibre (narrowtrench) build, which may explain the lack of large ducting acces covers. (The ducting ends in a box called a "TOBY". Don't ask what it stands for.)

su1718.jpgCable customer since 1993. Services: FH TV, Sky Sports & Movies (2xV6), Talk Anytime Phone, VIVID 350, Virgin PAYG Mobile

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Ignition
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Re: Virgin cabinets


nodrogd wrote:

These might be used in fibre delivery areas, but not in HFC. The ones used in HFC areas are double that size.


There are 3 of them on a 200 metre stretch of road here delivering HFC. There is ample room in them for a line extender and tap banks.

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Re: Virgin cabinets


nodrogd wrote:

CFarrell1996 wrote:
May I ask what HFC is? Also, around the outer parts of town there are the bigger cabinets, from looking online they serve 3,000 homes per 1? There is 3 of these big cabs so I guess they're the 'bigger' ones you was on about. Oh yeah forgot to say also where the trenches were made , there are virgin media cable duct things, don't know what the actual name is but each property has one outside of it branded 'Virgin Media'.

Hybrid Fibre Coaxial, which is the historic method of providing cable services (Fibre to a street node, then coaxial cable via multiple "slave" cabinets to customers). HFC cabs also incorporate telephone distribution systems. HFC is now only used in new build where original plans exist but build was never completed. New build areas & not previously planned infill are now installed as RFoG (Radio Frequency over Glass), where fibre goes to a powered Omni-box on the front of the customers house that converts Fibre to Coax for internal distribution.


As a general rule infill is HFC when it's extensions of, or adjacent to, existing plant, unless there's a lot of it. New build is RFoG.

In Leeds HFC is being used to infill various areas in the city including entirely new nodes in Morley, Batley, and other places. FTTP is being used in greenfield builds in Kippax and Garforth.

The build surrounding me would've probably been FTTP had it come later, however at over 10,000 premises passed all in one area where there was previously nothing calling it an infill is perhaps a stretch.

RFoG will never be used where infill is extensions of existing nodal areas and generally doesn't make sense unless the build is fairly large. For obvious reasons it requires a fair bit more transmission equipment to power optical transceivers for each 32 premises passed rather than each 500, and the CPE is more expensive as HFC's termination into the home is passive, while FTTP requires on ONT. The cost savings can also be relatively limited where there is a lot of block paving and carriageway work to do.

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